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Invasive Species Resources

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Chinese Academy of Sciences.
Recently, a team led by Prof. LI Yiming from the Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, conducted a comprehensive study evaluating the invasion risk of global alien vertebrates, to help facilitate the balance between development and conservation for the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI). This study, published with the title of "Risks of biological invasion on the Belt and Road" in Current Biology, was online on January 24, 2019. The Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) proposed by China is regarded as the biggest global development program ever to occur on earth. It involves nearly half of our planet across Asia, Europe, Africa, Oceania and America, covering 77% (27/35) global biodiversity hotspots. Its high expenditure into infrastructure constructions may accelerate trade and transportation and thus promote alien species invasions, which is one primary anthropogenic threat to global biodiversity. 
USDA. National Agricultural Library.
Great Lakes Fishery Commission.
Great Lakes Fishery Commission.
Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food, and Rural Affairs (Canada).
State of the Environment Norway.
Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation.
See also: Invasive Species Information for more resources
British Columbia Ministry of Agriculture.
Plant Health Australia.
Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources.
The Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources (MDAR) announced today that a single dead specimen of the invasive pest known as spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula) was reported and confirmed at a private residence in Boston. As a result, MDAR is urging the public to check for signs of spotted lanternfly adults in any potted plants that they may have received over the holiday season and to report any potential sightings of this pest on MDAR's online reporting form by taking photographs and collecting a specimen if possible. Residents should look for large, gray insects, about one inch long, with black spots and red underwings.
USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.
Nordic Council of Ministers. Nordregio.
One of the projects supported by the Arctic Co-operation programme of the Nordic Council of Ministers is launching a major campaign to raise public awareness of the threat posed to the Arctic by alien species travelling with tourists and other visitors. Nordregio takes part in the campaign in its capacity as secretariat for the Nordic-Arctic programme. “Are you travelling alone?” asks an animated polar bear in a new campaign video as he examines some clothes, shoes and equipment belonging to the travellers that step off boats and airplanes that bring them to the Arctic. The video is launched together with travel operators, airline companies, travel agencies and tourist offices that have the Arctic as a travel destination, as well as national and regional authorities to make sure it reaches as far as possible – hopefully unlike the alien species it aims to warn against.
Australian Government. Department of Agriculture and Water Resources.
Australia has implemented stronger offshore biosecurity measures for the upcoming brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB) season, to manage risks associated with this significant cargo pest. BMSB emerged as a biosecurity threat for Australia in 2014. They are a threat to a large range of plant species, including fruit, vegetables and ornamental plants. If BMSB was to arrive in Australia, it could significantly impact on the nation's plant health and potentially impact on trade. For more information, visit Seasonal Measures for BMSB.
Swaziland National Trust Commission.
Bahamas Ministry of Agriculture, Marine Resources and Local Government; Global Environment Facility.
Great Britain Non-native Species Secretariat; Scottish Government.
The financial cost of non-native species has been published in a new report. "The Economic Cost of Invasive Non-Native Species (INNS) to the British Economy" suggests that invasive species cost 1.7 billion pounds every year. The research was conducted by the international scientific organization CABI for the Scottish Government, Defra and the Welsh Assembly Government and breaks down the effect on each country. It indicates that the economic cost of INNS can be wide ranging and can result in the loss of crops, ecosystems and livelihoods. The cost to the agriculture and horticulture sector alone is estimated to be 1 billion pounds across Britain. See Great Britain Non-native Species Secretariat - Reports for the full report and supporting document.