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Invasive Species Resources

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North Dakota Game and Fish Department.
North Dakota Department of Agriculture.

Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

National Conference of State Legislatures.
National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL) tracks environment and natural resources legislation to bring you up-to-date, real-time information on bills (from 2015) that have been introduced in the 50 states and the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories. Database provides search options by state (or territory), topic, keyword, year, status or primary sponsor. Topics include: Wildlife-Invasive Species and Wildlife-Pollinators.
Nature Conservancy. Don't Move Firewood.
Provides specific state information on their firewood regulations and recommendations (includes Canada and Mexico).

Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation.
Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources.
Great Lakes Commission. Great Lakes Phragmites Collaborative.
North Dakota Department of Agriculture.

Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

North Dakota Department of Agriculture.
Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri) and houndstongue (Cynoglossum officinale L.) have been added to the state noxious weed list. Palmer amaranth is an aggressive pigweed species similar in appearance to waterhemp and was first found in the state last year. It has now been found in five counties. Houndstongue, which does not spread aggressively like Palmer amaranth, has been found in North Dakota since at least 1911 but infestations have tripled since 2008. It is now found in at least 25 counties. The public is urged to work with local weed officers, extension agents and other experts to identify and report suspect plants. More information on these and other noxious and invasive weeds is available at https://www.nd.gov/ndda/plant-industries/noxious-weeds.