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Invasive Species Resources

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University of Nevada - Reno. Cooperative Extension.
See also: Agriculture Publications for more fact sheets
University of Alaska - Anchorage. Alaska Center for Conservation Science.
Alberta Invasive Species Council.
See also: Invasive Plant Mapping with EDDMapS Alberta
North Dakota Department of Agriculture.
North Dakota Game and Fish Department.
Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management. Office of Water Resources.
You can take actions to prevent the further spread of AIS. It is essential for boaters and recreational users of lakes and ponds to be vigilant!
USDA. FS. Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit.
Fisheries and Oceans Canada.
Nevada Department of Wildlife.
The Nevada aquatic invasive species (AIS) decal requirement became effective Jan 1, 2013 through approval from the Nevada State Legislature in 2011. The AIS decal requirement was established to prevent the spread of harmful aquatic species threatening Nevada's waterways.
Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management.
Nevada Department of Wildlife.
Tahoe Resource Conservation District.
North Dakota Game and Fish Department.
Asian Carp Regional Coordinating Committee.

Asian Carp Regional Coordinating Committee; Flickr.

Asian Carp Regional Coordinating Committee.

Massachusetts Introduced Pests Outreach Project.
The Asian longhorned beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis, "ALB"), a pest of hardwood trees including maple, birch and horse chestnut, was first discovered in Worcester, Massachusetts in 2008. Since their discovery, $50 million in federal and state money has been spent to eradicate the beetle, and 25,000 infested trees in the Worcester area have been cut down in an effort to halt the spread. Use this form to report a possible Asian longhorned beetle sighting in Massachusetts or other states.
Massachusetts Introduced Pests Outreach Project.