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Invasive Species Resources

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Forestry Commission (United Kingdom). Forest Research.

Forestry Commission (United Kingdom). Forest Research.

Honey Bee Health Coalition.
European Environment Agency.
Invasive alien species (IAS) have become a major driver of biodiversity loss, second only to habitat fragmentation in recent decade. Europe is particularly affected by alien species, which are invading the continent an unprecedented pace. Their impact means that many of the region's rarest endemic species are on the brink of extinction and that our well-being and economies are affected. Establishing an early warning and rapid response framework for Europe become a key target. The present publication is the EEA contribution to achieving this goal.
Forest Gene Conservation Association (Canada).
Global Invasive Species Programme.
See also: GISP Publications and Reports for additional reports for Asia
Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew (United Kingdom).
Kew's UK Overseas Territories (UKOTs) team recently returned from a successful launch of the Tropical Important Plant Areas project in the British Virgin Islands. Tropical Important Plant Areas (TIPAs) are target sites for plant and habitat conservation, identified by the presence of threatened species, threatened habitats and/or high botanical richness. Although TIPAs are not legal designations, they can inform the protection and management of sites for biodiversity conservation.
North Dakota Department of Agriculture.
Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri) and houndstongue (Cynoglossum officinale L.) have been added to the state noxious weed list. Palmer amaranth is an aggressive pigweed species similar in appearance to waterhemp and was first found in the state last year. It has now been found in five counties. Houndstongue, which does not spread aggressively like Palmer amaranth, has been found in North Dakota since at least 1911 but infestations have tripled since 2008. It is now found in at least 25 counties. The public is urged to work with local weed officers, extension agents and other experts to identify and report suspect plants. More information on these and other noxious and invasive weeds is available at https://www.nd.gov/ndda/plant-industries/noxious-weeds.
U.S. Department of Agriculture.
USDA Service Centers are designed to be a single location where customers can access the services provided by the Farm Service Agency, Natural Resources Conservation Service, and the Rural Development agencies. This locator site provides Agency offices serving your area (by state and county).
Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food, and Rural Affairs (Canada).
Google. YouTube; Honey Bee Health Coalition.
See also: Tools for Varroa Management Playlist for more videos
Victoria Department of Jobs, Precincts and Regions (Australia). Agriculture.

Northland Regional Council (New Zealand).

Brisbane City Council (Australia).
Brisbane City Council (Australia).
Brisbane City Council (Australia).
Brisbane City Council (Australia).
Northern Territory Government (Australia).
Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (Australia). AdaptNRM.