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Invasive Species Resources

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North Dakota Department of Agriculture.
North Dakota Game and Fish Department.
North Dakota Game and Fish Department.
Mississippi Department of Agriculture.

North Dakota Department of Agriculture.

Feral swine are an invasive species which cause extensive damage to crops, property, and the environment. They are also known to carry over 30 diseases and 37 parasites that can be transmitted to livestock, people, pets, and wildlife. When feral swine are sighted in North Dakota, the State Board of Animal Health should be notified immediately. Attempts will be made to identify whether the swine are truly feral or if they are escaped domestic swine which are private property. Individuals who encounter feral swine should not destroy them unless they encounter feral swine on their own property and there is a threat of harm or destruction of property. As soon as possible following destruction of the animal, but always within 24 hours, the individual must notify the State Board of Animal Health (BoAH) at 701-328-2655.

North Dakota Department of Agriculture.
North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. North Carolina Forest Service.
The emerald ash borer is a metallic green beetle that bores into ash trees feeding on tissues beneath the bark, ultimately killing the tree. It is not native to the United States and was first found in the U.S. near Detroit, Michigan in 2002. In 2013, the emerald ash borer was found in Granville, Person, Vance, and Warren counties in North Carolina. In 2015 it was found in many additional counties, and a statewide EAB quarantine went into effect in North Carolina.
Mississippi Forestry Commission.
Mississippi's ash trees are living on borrowed time. Every day the emerald ash borer is not detected in Mississippi is a minor victory. Infestations in surrounding Tennessee (detected 2010 near Nashville), Arkansas (detected in 2014 near Hot Springs) and north-central Louisiana (2015) continue to expand, despite quarantines in those areas. Most frighteningly, EAB was confirmed in Calhoun County, Alabama in October 2016. EAB now has Mississippi surrounded, and it is likely only a matter of time before it finds its way here. To prevent the spread of this and other non-native beetles, do not move firewood. Firewood is a vehicle for movement of tree-killing forest pests including EAB and Asian longhorned beetle. See Forest Health Articles for more pest alerts.
North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission.
North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. North Carolina Forest Service.
Mississippi Forestry Commission.
Mississippi Forestry Commission.
Mississippi Forestry Commission.
See also: Forest Health Articles for more diseases
Idaho Department of Lands.
See also: Forester Forums for more fact sheets
North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Plant Industry Division. Plant Protection Section.

Idaho State Department of Agriculture.

The primary purpose of the Idaho State Department of Agriculture's (ISDA's) noxious weed cost share grant program is to accelerate the attack on invasive weeds by supplementing local funds and resources, not replacing them. Cost sharing is also intended to provide additional incentives for local landowners, officials, and citizens to work collaboratively to develop a more comprehensive and effective noxious weed management program.

North Dakota Game and Fish Department.
View current information on the locations of curlyleaf pondweed, Eurasian watermilfoil, and zebra mussels in North Dakota waters.
North Carolina Department of Transportation.
Massachusetts Department of Fish and Game. Natural Heritage & Endangered Species Program.