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Invasive Species Resources

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Great Britain Non-Native Species Secretariat.
The Be Plant Wise campaign, launched by Defra and the Scottish Government, is designed to raise awareness among gardeners, pond owners and retailers of the damage caused by invasive aquatic plants and to encourage the public to dispose of these plants correctly. We have developed resources with advice for gardeners and pond owners and are working closely with retailers of aquatic plants to provide information in stores. These pages contain the detailed information you need to Be Plant Wise.
Michigan State University. W.K. Kellogg Biological Station.
Lesson plans are searchable using "invasive" as a keyword.
GloBallast Partnerships Programme.
Building Partnerships to Assist Developing Countries to Reduce the Transfer of Harmful Aquatic Organisms in Ships’ Ballast Water, simply referred to as GloBallast Partnerships (GBP), was initiated in late 2007 and is intended to build on the progress made in the original project. This was initially planned as a five-year project, from October 2007 to October 2012, but was extended until June 2017.
Pet Industry Joint Advisory Council of Canada; Environment Canada.
Welcome to Habitattitude, a web site dedicated to invasive alien species for aquarium hobbyists, backyard pond owners, water gardeners and others who are concerned about conserving our natural aquatic environment. Introduction and spread of harmful plants and animals in our waterways as a result of these activities, is a growing concern. While most aquatic invasive species do not survive when released into the environment, some may, and if left unchecked, can cause irreversible damage to the environment by degrading our aquatic resources and making waters unusable for recreation. If you are an aquarium hobbyist or enjoy backyard pond and water gardening, you can learn more on this website.
Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters.
Gulf and Caribbean Fisheries Institute.
The Invasive Lionfish Web Portal, developed by the Gulf and Caribbean Fisheries Institute in partnership with NOAA, supports the management and control of lionfish in conservation areas along the Southeast coast of the U.S. and Caribbean.

Mississippi Department of Marine Resources.

Michigan State University. Integrated Pest Management Program.
This curriculum provides background information, hands-on activities, worksheets and links to additional sites that teachers can utilize to engage students in formal and informal real-world settings. While some of the lessons build on previous learning, most of the lessons can stand-alone. IPM can be used as a theme in the classroom for an entire year, or as enrichment to regular classroom activities.
Massachusetts Introduced Pest Outreach Project.
Mississippi State University.
Mississippi Bug Blues is a project that seeks to educate the people of Mississippi about invasive species of insects that pose a threat to our state, its people, and its resources. The main responsibility of this campaign is to educate. Some species, such as the Emerald Ash Borer, have not been found in Mississippi yet, but are a threat because it has been found in several neighboring states. For other species, like the Red Imported Fire Ant, it is too late to prevent them from finding a way into Mississippi, but informing the public about how to avoid such species and control their population are also important.
Mississippi State University. Extension Service.
This manual contains three types of activities. First there are introductory, or awareness-building, activities. The second type focuses on both beneficial and detrimental characteristics of exotics. And finally there are activities intended as reinforcers. The best advantage can be gained from this set by selecting at least one introductory activity and several from the second set and following up with routine monitoring of a nonindigenous species in your community.
Pacific Biosecurity; Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme; Pacific Community.
Ontario's Invading Species Awareness Program (Canada).
Provides free DVDs, watch cards, magnets, brochures, and other outreach materials.
Invasive Species Council of British Columbia.
There are many great resources available for educators and youth to learn about invasive species in British Columbia.
Nordic Council of Ministers. Nordregio.
One of the projects supported by the Arctic Co-operation programme of the Nordic Council of Ministers is launching a major campaign to raise public awareness of the threat posed to the Arctic by alien species travelling with tourists and other visitors. Nordregio takes part in the campaign in its capacity as secretariat for the Nordic-Arctic programme. “Are you travelling alone?” asks an animated polar bear in a new campaign video as he examines some clothes, shoes and equipment belonging to the travellers that step off boats and airplanes that bring them to the Arctic. The video is launched together with travel operators, airline companies, travel agencies and tourist offices that have the Arctic as a travel destination, as well as national and regional authorities to make sure it reaches as far as possible – hopefully unlike the alien species it aims to warn against.