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Invasive Species Resources

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Washington Native Plant Society.
Tennessee Department of Agriculture.
Three Tennessee counties have been quarantined for Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) after detection of the forest-devastating insect, bringing the total number of Tennessee counties under a state and federal EAB quarantine to 62. Cheatham, Giles, and Maury counties have been added to the list of areas restricted for the movement of firewood, ash nursery stock, ash timber, and other material that can spread EAB. The tree-killing beetle was recently found in these three counties through the United States Department of Agriculture’s EAB detection program.
Pacific Biodiversity Institute (Washington).
North Dakota Department of Agriculture.
North Dakota Game and Fish Department.
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.
Operators of watercraft not registered in Washington State, seaplanes, and commercial transporters of specified vessel types must purchase aquatic invasive species (AIS) prevention permits to help prevent the spread of AIS in Washington. AIS prevention permits are valid for one year and can be purchased online (under the "Other" Product Categories tab) or from any of the department's authorized license dealers. When purchasing online, you may select a preferred activation date. The permit will be valid for one year from that date.
North Dakota Game and Fish Department.
Delaware Department of Agriculture.
A destructive, invasive beetle that kills ash trees, the emerald ash borer (EAB), has been confirmed in Delaware, making it the 28th state to have found the insect, the Delaware Department of Agriculture announced today. Delaware will be added to a federal quarantine already in 27 other states restricting the interstate shipment of all ash wood and wood products - ash nursery stock, green lumber, waste, compost and chips - as well as hardwood firewood of all species.
Massachusetts Introduced Pests Outreach Project.
The Asian longhorned beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis, "ALB"), a pest of hardwood trees including maple, birch and horse chestnut, was first discovered in Worcester, Massachusetts in 2008. Since their discovery, $50 million in federal and state money has been spent to eradicate the beetle, and 25,000 infested trees in the Worcester area have been cut down in an effort to halt the spread. Use this form to report a possible Asian longhorned beetle sighting in Massachusetts or other states.
Massachusetts Introduced Pests Outreach Project.
Delaware Invasive Species Council.
Be on the lookout for these up-and-coming invaders! They might not be in Delaware yet, but our best defense is early detection and rapid response!
University of Tennessee Extension.
See also: Entomology and Plant Pathology - Publications and Multimedia Catalog for more resources
Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry.
In May 2010 the last boll weevil was trapped in the state and in March 2012 the boll weevil was declared eradicated from the state of Louisiana. The Eradication Program is now at a maintenance level, funded through grower maintenance inspection fees. Traps are placed and monitored according to an approved trapping protocol. Cotton producers have seen increases in yields along with a reduction in the cost of insect control.

North Dakota Department of Agriculture.

Feral swine are an invasive species which cause extensive damage to crops, property, and the environment. They are also known to carry over 30 diseases and 37 parasites that can be transmitted to livestock, people, pets, and wildlife. When feral swine are sighted in North Dakota, the State Board of Animal Health should be notified immediately. Attempts will be made to identify whether the swine are truly feral or if they are escaped domestic swine which are private property. Individuals who encounter feral swine should not destroy them unless they encounter feral swine on their own property and there is a threat of harm or destruction of property. As soon as possible following destruction of the animal, but always within 24 hours, the individual must notify the State Board of Animal Health (BoAH) at 701-328-2655.

Louisiana State University. AgCenter Research and Extension.
Citrus canker, a serious disease of citrus, was recently found on trees in East Baton Rouge and Livingston parishes, according to LSU AgCenter plant doctor Raj Singh. Citrus canker is a highly contagious bacterial disease that was first detected around 1914 in Louisiana and declared eradicated by 1940. The disease is known to cause defoliation, premature fruit drop, blemished fruit and tree decline. Severely infected trees ultimately may stop producing fruit. If you believe your citrus trees have citrus canker, contact the U.S. Department of Agriculture at 225-298-5410 or the LDAF Horticulture and Quarantine Division at 225-952-8100
Washington State Noxious Weed Control Board.
The Washington State noxious weed list is updated every year, and all Washington residents can submit proposals to add or remove species, change the class of a listed noxious weed, or to change the designated area in which control is required for a Class B noxious weed. Anyone, including citizens, tribes, organizations, government agencies, and county noxious weed control boards may participate in the listing process by submitting a proposal or by submitting testimony about proposed changes to the noxious weed list. In fact, Washington's open, inclusive listing process is lauded by other states for its encouragement of public participation. Learn more about the listing process here.