An official website of the United States government

The .gov means it’s official.
Federal government websites always use a .gov or .mil domain. Before sharing sensitive information online, make sure you’re on a .gov or .mil site by inspecting your browser’s address (or “location”) bar.

This site is also protected by an SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) certificate that’s been signed by the U.S. government. The https:// means all transmitted data is encrypted  — in other words, any information or browsing history that you provide is transmitted securely.

You are here Back to top

Invasive Species Resources

Displaying 161 to 180 of 1478

Search Help
Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development (Canada).
North Dakota State University Agriculture and University Extension.
Caribbean Invasive Alien Species Network.
To date no studies have been undertaken on the costs and benefits of IAS management in the Caribbean. This may partly explain why there has been negligible funding to combat the onslaught of these exotic species in the region. As a result it was decided to provide individuals involved in the UNEP-GEF Project, "Mitigating the Threats of Invasive Alien Species in the Insular Caribbean" with training and an opportunity to undertake Cost-Benefit Analyses (CBAs) on some selected IAS. The CBAs undertaken and reported in this publication clearly demonstrates that the benefits of managing IAS outweigh the costs.
University of Massachusetts - Boston.

Natural Resources Canada. Canadian Forest Service.

Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (Canada).
Purdue University Extension (Indiana).
Use this website to find out where in Indiana the emerald ash borer (EAB) is located, how to combat this invasive pest, and what you can do to preserve ash trees in Indiana. To report a find of EAB in Indiana, call Indiana DNR toll-free 1-866-NO-EXOTIC.
South Australia Primary Industries and Regions (Australia).
UNFAO. Animal Production and Health Division.
Bay of Plenty Regional Council (New Zealand).
Auckland Council (New Zealand).
Australian Government. Department of Agriculture and Water Resources.
Formerly the Invasive Plants and Animals Committee (IPAC).
UNFAO. International Plant Protection Convention.
You cannot protect the environment without also safeguarding plant health. When plant pests and diseases spread into new areas they seriously damage entire ecosystems, putting at risk biological diversity and the environment itself. Tiny and lethal at the same time, plant pests and invasive alien species have been recently identified as the main driver of biodiversity loss. Pests are also responsible for losses of up to USD 220 billion in agricultural trade each year and the loss of 40 percent of the global food crop production. Climate change is making the situation even worse. It is changing the life cycle of pests – sometimes increasing the number of yearly generations - and creating new niches where they can thrive. For more information see the IPPC factsheet "Plant Health and Environmental Protection (PDF | 1.22 MB)".
European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization.
European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization.
Contains several databases: EPPO Codes, EPPO Global Database, EPPO Database on PP1 Standards – Efficacy evaluation of PPPs, EPPO Database on Diagnostic Expertise, and CAPRA (Computer Assisted Pest Risk Analysis).
European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization.

European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization.