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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources (alphabetically), with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Missouri Department of Conservation.

Invasive crayfish (also called crawdads) displace crayfish species naturally found in bodies of water ("native" species). They introduce disease, hurt fishing, and harm aquatic ecosystems. Our best hope of controlling them is to prevent their introduction to new locations.

Missoula County Weed District (Montana).

This curriculum is designed to be a supplemental curriculum for teachers who want to integrate the topic of invasive weeds into their existing courses. This curriculum will provide teachers, educators, and weed professionals with an ecologically-based invasive weed curriculum that assists students in developing awareness, knowledge and skills that will result in responsible land stewardship in the state of Montana.

Governor of the State of Hawai'i.

October is "Stop the Ant Month" in Hawai'i and a multi-agency effort will be ongoing throughout the month to increase awareness of the importance of early detection to prevent and control the spread of the invasive little fire ant (LFA). The Hawai'i Department of Agriculture (HDOA), Hawai'i Ant Lab (HAL) and partner agencies, including the Hawai'i Invasive Species Council, the Invasive Species Committees and the Coordinating Group on Alien Pest Species will be asking residents on O'ahu, Kaua'i and Maui County to survey their properties for LFA by using a little peanut butter on a chopstick and leaving them in several areas for about one hour. Residents may request a free ant-collection kit through the website: http://stoptheant.org/. The website also has maps of areas where LFA have been detected in Hawai'i.