An official website of the United States government

The .gov means it’s official.
Federal government websites always use a .gov or .mil domain. Before sharing sensitive information online, make sure you’re on a .gov or .mil site by inspecting your browser’s address (or “location”) bar.

This site is also protected by an SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) certificate that’s been signed by the U.S. government. The https:// means all transmitted data is encrypted  — in other words, any information or browsing history that you provide is transmitted securely.

You are here Back to top

Invasive Species Resources

Displaying 121 to 140 of 175

Search Help

Minnesota Department of Agriculture.

Minnesota Department of Agriculture.

Minnesota Department of Agriculture.

Minnesota Department of Agriculture.

University of Minnesota. Minnesota Invasive Terrestrial Plants and Pests Center.
To determine which pests posed immediate threats, MITPPC undertook an expansive evaluation process. It convened 15 expert panelists, who ultimately identified 124 significant invasive species threatening our state. This panel also identified 17 criteria that could be used to rate species in an objective, computerized ranking system. Criteria included factors like environmental and economic impact, ability to establish and spread and proximity to the state. Rankings are updated regularly, no later than every other year or as new threats emerge on a more urgent basis. The full whitepaper, "Minnesota's Top 124 Terrestrial Invasive Plants and Pests: Priorities for Research (PDF | 1.4 MB)," outlines all prioritization methods and results

University of Minnesota. Extension.

North Dakota State University.

North Dakota State University.
North Dakota State University.
USDA. FS. Alaska Region.
Partnering with a local Alaskan native community, the U.S. Forest Service has for the first time published a dual language booklet in English and a native Alaskan language, Yup'ik, to help educate the greater community in Southwestern Alaska on invasive species. This publication, Protecting Southwestern Alaska from Invasive Species: A Guide in the English and Yup'ik Languages, aims to explain invasive species concerns unique to Southwestern Alaska, which is home to a large community of the indigenous Yup'ik people.
Prince William Sound Regional Citizens' Advisory Council.
See also: Marine Invasive Species for more fact sheets

North Dakota State University.

A North Dakota Emerald Ash Borer First Detector Program has been cooperatively developed by the North Dakota Forest Service, North Dakota State University, North Dakota Department of Agriculture, National Plant Diagnostic Network and the USDA APHIS Plant Protection and Quarantine to train citizens of North Dakota to correctly identify symptoms and signs of EAB. If you are interested in becoming an EAB first detector in North Dakota, contact Aaron.D.Bergdahl(at)ndsu.edu. Also available is the 2014 Emerald Ash Borer First Detector Manual (PDF | 33.7 MB).

North Dakota Weed Control Association.

Minnesota Department of Agriculture.

North Dakota Department of Trust Lands.
Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries.
North Dakota Department of Agriculture.
Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri), an aggressive pigweed species similar in appearance to waterhemp, has been positively identified for the first time in North Dakota in McIntosh County. Palmer amaranth is native to the southwestern U.S. but was accidentally introduced to other areas and has devastated crops in the South and Midwest. It had not been identified in North Dakota until now. The public is urged to work with local weed officers, extension agents and other experts to identify and report suspect plants. More information on Palmer amaranth and other noxious and invasive weeds is available here. To report a suspect plant, contact the North Dakota Department of Agriculture at 701-328-2250 or North Dakota State University Extension at 701-231-8157 or 701-857-7677.
Minnesota Department of Agriculture.
In September 2016, Palmer amaranth, Amaranthus palmeri, was found in Minnesota. To date, it has been documented in Douglas, Jackson, Lyon, Redwood, Todd, and Yellow Medicine counties. The Minnesota Department of Agriculture (MDA), University of Minnesota Extension, USDA, landowners and other partners are working to eradicate these infestations before they can spread to new areas. Be proactive and prevent Palmer amaranth establishment. Familiarize yourself with Palmer amaranth identification and actively look for it in crop fields, borders, ditches, conservation lands and around dairies. If you suspect Palmer amaranth on your property, immediately call your local U of M Extension Educator or IPM Specialist, crop consultant and/or the MDA’s Arrest the Pest (888-545-6684) to report locations.