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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources (alphabetically), with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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University of Alaska - Fairbanks. Cooperative Extension Service.

The Alaska IPM program (AK IPM) addresses the public need for pest management education within the state.

Cornell University (New York). New York State Agricultural Experiment Station.
Montana State University.
The Center for Invasive Species Management closed in 2015. Archives of relevant materials are available here.

University of Arkansas. Cooperative Extension Service.

The collection of digital images is provided as a service to Arkansas agriculture. These images represent symptoms of both pathological (infectious) and non-pathological (physiological/environmental) disorders of agronomic row crops and horticultural crops that grow in Arkansas. These photos are useful as an identification tool to growers of the crops listed.

Cornell University. Agriculture and Life Sciences.
This guide provides photographs and descriptions of biological control (or biocontrol) agents of insect, disease, and weed pests in North America. It is also a tutorial on the concept and practice of biological control and integrated pest management (IPM). Whether you are an educator, a commercial grower, a student, a researcher, a land manager, or an extension or regulatory agent, we hope you will find this information useful.
Montana State University Extension.

Kansas State University. Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service.

See also: Weed Management Publications for more resources

University of Idaho. Extension.

The goal of the University of Idaho Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Center is to provide educational information and resources for the pest management needs of Idaho. We strive to help the people of Idaho reduce risks to human health, the environment and the economy caused by pests and pest management practices.

Montana State University. Center for Invasive Species Management.
See also: Surveying and Monitoring for more resources
University of Arkansas. Cooperative Extension Service.
See also: Urban Entomology/Pest Management in Arkansas for more factsheets
University of Alaska Anchorage. Institute of Social and Economic Research.
Montana State University. Extension Service.

University of Missouri-Columbia.

Integrated pest management (IPM) is a sustainable approach to managing insect, pathogen, and weed pests through a coordinated decision-making/action-taking process. The goal of IPM is to mitigate pest damage while protecting human health, environmental quality, and economic viability. The MU IPM program is partially funded by a federal grant. It is multidisciplinary and involves a large team of scientists and extension specialists.

University of Missouri. Integrated Pest Management.
View current pest alerts for your region, or sign up to receive email alerts. Pest Monitoring Alerts are sent by e-mail to subscribers when pest captures reach significant numbers.

Montana State University. Extension Service.

Working to reduce health and environmental risks from pest management, as well as improve practices, and increase Integrated Pest Management (IPM) adoption. Our focus areas involve tactics and tools for plant protection, enhancing agricultural biosecurity, and IPM for sustainable communities.  The program encompasses four areas; agronomic crops, communities, pest diagnostic facilities, and pesticide education.  The overall goal of the Integrated Pest Management program is to develop and deliver information on IPM practices in Montana.