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Invasive Species Resources

Displaying 1 to 19 of 19

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USDA. Forest Service.
There are 21 major species of noxious weeds (invasive) on the Black Hills National Forest in western South Dakota and northeastern Wyoming. 
USDA. FS. Southern Research Station. CompassLive.
DOI. NPS. Great Smoky Mountains National Park.
USDA. FS. Forest Health Protection. Southern Region.
View the updated regional infestation map for Laurel Wilt Disease (for initial detection in May 2002. Map is updated periodically (USDA,FS - Forest & Grassland Health).
DOI. NPS. Science of the American Southwest.
See also: Invasive Plant Species for more fact sheets
DOI. NPS. Science of the American Southwest.
See also: Invasive Plant Species for more fact sheets.
DOI. NPS. Science of the American Southwest.
See also: Invasive Plant Species for more fact sheets
DOI. NPS. Science of the American Southwest.
See also: Invasive Plant Species for more fact sheets
USDA. FS. Southern Research Station.

Provides field notes on forest pest research, including invasive pests.
Note: Content is also available by email subscription.

USDA. Forest Service. Southwestern Region.
The U.S. Forest Service has developed a number of Regional documents for invasive species management for the Southwestern Region (Region 3). Region 3 covers national forests and grasslands in Arizona and New Mexico along with national grasslands in western Oklahoma and the Texas panhandle.Region 3 covers national forests and grasslands in Arizona and New Mexico along with national grasslands in western Oklahoma and the Texas panhandle.
USDA. FS. Southern Research Station. CompassLive.

White-nose syndrome (WNS) has killed more than six million bats over the past decade. WNS is caused by the fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd). Studies show that bats eat enough insect pests to save the U.S. corn industry more than $1 billion a year in crop damage and pesticide costs, and more than $3 billion per year to all agricultural production including forests.
 

To help fund the research needed to combat this deadly disease, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced $2.5 million in grants for research of high priority questions about WNS that will improve our ability to manage the disease and conserve affected bats.

USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

On October 10, 2019, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) in coordination with the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, and New York City Department of Parks and Recreation announced that they have eliminated the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB) from the New York City boroughs of Brooklyn and Queens. "I am proud to say that we have eradicated Asian longhorned beetle from Brooklyn and Queens," said Greg Ibach, USDA's Under Secretary for Marketing and Regulatory Programs. "This officially marks the end of our 23-year long battle with this pest in New York City."

USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

The United States Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has established a quarantine for European cherry fruit fly (ECFF) in New York. A portion of Niagara County is quarantined for the invasive fruit fly following the detection of 51 flies in 2017. APHIS and the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets (NYSDAM) are working collaboratively on this detection. The ECFF quarantine area encompasses approximately 92 square miles of Niagara County.
See also: Fruit Flies for additional information.