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Invasive Species Resources

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DOI. NPS. Biscayne National Park.

DHS. Customs and Border Protection.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) agriculture specialists have already intercepted a dozen significant and potentially destructive pests this year at various ports of entry in Florida as part of the agency's all-encompassing efforts to safeguard American agriculture.

Unknown pests pose a significant risk in agriculture due to a lack of knowledge in controlling the pests and the extent of damage they can cause to crops. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) entomologists recently classified eight pests discovered by CBP agriculture specialists in Florida as first-in-the-nation interceptions and another pest as a new species.

DOI. NPS. Great Smoky Mountains National Park.
DOI. National Park Service.
DOI. NPS. Buffalo National River.
On Tuesday, June 5, 2018, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Veterinary Services Laboratory (NVSL) confirmed the presence of the Longhorned tick (Haemaphysalis longicornis) in Arkansas. The Longhorned tick is an exotic East Asian tick associated with bacterial and viral tickborne diseases of animals and humans in other parts of the world. This tick is considered by USDA to be a serious threat to livestock because heavy tick infestations may cause stunted growth, decreased production and animal deaths. Like deer-ticks, the nymphs of the Longhorned tick are very small (resembling tiny spiders) and can easily go unnoticed on animals and people. This tick is known to infest a wide range of species and has the potential to infect multiple North American wildlife species, humans, dogs, cats, and livestock.
DOI. NPS. Glen Canyon National Recreation Area.
Quagga mussel larvae, or veligers, were first confirmed in Lake Powell in late 2012 after routine water monitoring tests discovered mussel DNA in water samples taken from the vicinity of Antelope Point and the Glen Canyon Dam. As of early 2016, thousands of adult quagga mussels have been found in Lake Powell, attached to canyon walls, the Glen Canyon Dam, boats, and other underwater structures, especially in the southern portions of the lake. It is crucial to keep the mussels from moving from Lake Powell to other lakes and rivers. Utah and Arizona state laws require you to clean, drain, and dry your boat when leaving Lake Powell using self-decontamination procedures.
Smithsonian Institution. Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce.
Smithsonian Institution. Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce.
Smithsonian Institution. Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce.
Smithsonian Institution. Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce.
Smithsonian Institution. Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce.
Smithsonian Institution. Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce.
Smithsonian Institution. Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce.
Smithsonian Institution. Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce.
Smithsonian Institution. Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce.
Smithsonian Institution. Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce.