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Invasive Species Resources

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Cornell University. New York State Integrated Pest Management Program.

See also: Invasive Species & Exotic Pests for more factsheets

Finger Lakes Partnership for Regional Invasive Species Management (New York).
Mississippi State University. Geosystems Research Institute.
See also: Species Factsheets for more fact sheets
Lake George Association (New York).
Paul Smith's College (New York). Adirondack Watershed Institute.
Paul Smith's College (New York). Adirondack Watershed Institute.
Paul Smith's College (New York). Adirondack Watershed Institute.
Mississippi State University. Geosystems Research Institute.
New York Department of Environmental Conservation.
A regulation was adopted in 2014 that prohibits or regulates the possession, transport, importation, sale, purchase and introduction of select invasive species. The purpose of this regulation is to help control invasive species, a form of biological pollution, by reducing the introduction of new and spread of existing populations.
Lake George Park Commission.
From May 1st - Oct. 31st, all trailered boats being launched must be inspected at one of the 7 regional inspection stations.
University of Illinois. Department of Crop Sciences. Weed Science.
Mississippi State University. Extension.
Mississippi State University.
Mississippi Bug Blues is a project that seeks to educate the people of Mississippi about invasive species of insects that pose a threat to our state, its people, and its resources. The main responsibility of this campaign is to educate. Some species, such as the Emerald Ash Borer, have not been found in Mississippi yet, but are a threat because it has been found in several neighboring states. For other species, like the Red Imported Fire Ant, it is too late to prevent them from finding a way into Mississippi, but informing the public about how to avoid such species and control their population are also important.
New York State Department of Health.

Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program.

The Nature Conservancy's Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program (APIPP) is celebrating its 20th anniversary by launching a new public awareness campaign focused on the simple steps Adirondack residents and visitors can take to prevent invasive species from spreading into the places they love. The "Keep Invasive Species Out" campaign is centered around a new website, KeepInvasiveSpeciesOut.com, that provides an overview of the problem and offers simple, preventive solutions for limiting the likelihood of unintentionally spreading an invasive. Tips are given for specific outdoor activities, including hiking, camping, boating, fishing, hunting, mountain biking, horseback riding, gardening/landscaping, and farming.

New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse.

New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse.

New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse.

New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse.