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Invasive Species Resources

Displaying 1 to 8 of 8

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USDA. FS. Northern Research Station.
Select the non-indigenous forest pest to view maps depicting state and county distribution. Produced by: USDA, FS, Forest Health Protection, and its partners.
Cornell University (New York). New York State Agricultural Experiment Station.
USDA. FS. Forest Health Protection. Southern Region.
View the updated regional infestation map for Laurel Wilt Disease (for initial detection in May 2002. Map is updated periodically (USDA,FS - Forest & Grassland Health).
DOI. FWS. Midwest Region.
USDA. FS. Northeastern Area State and Private Forestry.
Provides distribution maps and predicted future range expansion.

University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health.

The Southeast Early Detection Network (SEEDN) app brings the power of Early Detection and Distribution Mapping System (EDDMapS) to your smartphone. Now you can submit invasive species observations directly with your smartphone from the field. These reports are uploaded to EDDMapS and e-mailed directly to local and state verifiers for review. SEEDN is more than just a smartphone app; it is an integrated invasive species reporting and outreach campaign for the Southeastern United States that includes the app and the EDDMapS website.

North Central Soybean Research Program. Soybean Research and Information Initiative.
Scroll and select Distribution to view known distribution of the soybean cyst nematode, Heterodera glycines, in counties in the United States and Canada in selected years from 1957 to 2014.