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Invasive Species Resources

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New York Invasive Species Awareness Week.

The mission of the New York Invasive Species Awareness Week (ISAW) is to promote knowledge and understanding of invasive species and the harm they can cause by engaging citizens in a wide range of activities across the state, and empowering them to take action to help stop the spread. This annual education campaign is comprised of various outreach initiatives and events led by partner organizations statewide. Activities include interpretive hikes, invasive plant removal, and restoration projects, displays, webinars, radio and television programming, and more.

Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program.
Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology.
Note: Nesting Behavior
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.
Cornell University (New York). New York State Agricultural Experiment Station.
Cornell University. Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County. Horticulture Diagnostic Laboratory.
See also: Tree and Shrub Disease for more fact sheets.
New York Department of Environmental Conservation.
Outreach and education is the most effective way to combat the spread of aquatic invasive species. The more people are made aware of the necessity of cleaning and drying boating and fishing equipment before using it in another waterbody, the less likely the aquatic invasive species will be spread to new waters. The following guidance/reminder sign templates are provided for you to download and use at private access points.
Lake Champlain Land Trust.
Cornell University. Agriculture and Life Sciences.
This guide provides photographs and descriptions of biological control (or biocontrol) agents of insect, disease, and weed pests in North America. It is also a tutorial on the concept and practice of biological control and integrated pest management (IPM). Whether you are an educator, a commercial grower, a student, a researcher, a land manager, or an extension or regulatory agent, we hope you will find this information useful.
Cornell University Cooperative Extension. Department of Natural Resources.
See also: ForestConnect Fact Sheet Series for more factsheets.
New York Department of Environmental Conservation.
Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station. Plant Disease Information Office.

Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station.

The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station (CAES) in cooperation with USDA APHIS Plant Protection and Quarantine (PPQ) announce the detection of single live adult spotted lanternfly, Lycoma delicatula, in Southbury, CT. While no other spotted lanternflies were found upon surveying the immediate area, a live insect strongly suggests others may be present within easy transport from somewhere in the region. Additional surveys in the area are planned.

The spotted lanternfly is an invasive sap-feeding planthopper that was discovered in Berks County, Pennsylvania in 2014. It is native to China, India, and Vietnam. It attacks many hosts and has the potential to severely impact Connecticut’s farm crops, particularly apples, grapes, and hops, as well as a number of tree species like maple. Early detection is important for the protection of Connecticut businesses and agriculture. The public is urged to report potential sightings of this invasive pest to ReportSLF@ct.gov. For more information, see the CAES Pest Alert (PDF | 1.9 MB).

Catskills Regional Invasive Species Partnership.
Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station.
New York Department of Environmental Conservation.
Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group.
Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group.
University of Connecticut. Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group.