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Invasive Species Resources

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California Invasive Plant Council.
The goal of this report is to capture the current state of knowledge on the use of fire as a tool to manage invasive plants in wildlands. By providing a more thorough source of information on this topic, we hope this review facilitates improved decision making when considering the use of prescribed burning for the management of invasive plants.
Vermont Agency of Natural Resources. Department of Forests, Parks, and Recreation.
As part of the ongoing response to the recent discovery of the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) within the state, Vermont has joined the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)'s 31-state quarantine boundary. The quarantine will help reduce the movement of infested ash wood to un-infested regions outside of Vermont's borders. Ash wood may not be moved from Vermont to Maine, Rhode Island, or 7 counties in New Hampshire because the pest has not been identified in these states and counties. Vermont is also developing a series of slow-the-spread recommendations, initially including recommendations for handling logs, firewood, and other ash materials. To learn more about these recommendations, to see a map indicating where EAB is known to occur in Vermont, and to report suspected invasive species like EAB, visit vtinvasives.org
Vermont Agency of Natural Resources. Environmental Conservation. Watershed Management Division.
Early detection is vital to protecting Vermont's water bodies from harmful invasive plants and animals. With more than 800 lakes and ponds throughout the state, volunteers play a key role in our surveying efforts. Vermont Invasive Patrollers (VIPs) monitor water bodies for new introductions of invasive species and report their findings to the Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC).
California Department of Food and Agriculture. Plant Health Division.
Includes public service announcements and related videos.
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.

Vermont Agency of Natural Resources. Fish & Wildlife Department.

California Department of Food and Agriculture. Animal Health Branch.

University of California. Cooperative Extension.
Moanalua Gardens Foundation (Hawaii).

Lake Champlain Basin Program.

California Department of Parks and Recreation. Division of Boating and Waterways.
This list is provided as a courtesy by the State of California. Additional waterbodies may be conducting watercraft inspections that are not included in this list. Before traveling, boaters are encouraged to contact the managing agency to obtain current information on inspections or restrictions.
Vermont Agency of Natural Resources. Department of Environmental Conservation.

University of California. Weed Research and Information Center.

See also: Weeds in Natural Areas for more information sheets

University of California. Statewide Integrated Pest Management Program.
University of Hawaii. College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources.
University of California. Cooperative Extension and Agricultural Experiment Station.
University of Hawaii. College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources.
See also: Weeds of Hawaii for more species guides
University of California - Davis.

West Virginia Department of Agriculture.

The West Virginia Department of Agriculture (WVDA) has confirmed the presence of a new, invasive insect, the Spotted Lanternfly (Lycormia delicatula), in West Virginia. A small population of Spotted Lanternfly was detected in the Bunker Hill area of Berkeley County on October 30. The United States Department of Agriculture – Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service confirmed the findings. "We have been surveying for this invasive pest for the past two years. We knew it was only a matter of time until the Spotted Lanternfly made it to our state," said Commissioner of Agriculture Kent Leonhardt. "The next step is to ask for formal assistance from our federal and state partners to put together an action plan to combat this pest." For more information or to report potential Spotted Lanternfly sightings, contact bugbusters@wvda.us or 304-788-1066.