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Invasive Species Resources

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University of California - Riverside. Center for Invasive Species Research.
University of California. Agricultural and Natural Resources. Kearney Agricultural Center. Citrus Entomology.

California Department of Food and Agriculture. Plant Health and Pest Prevention Services.

California Department of Food and Agriculture. Plant Health Division.
University of California. Agriculture and Natural Resources.
Provides information to both growers and home gardeners, in two distinct sub-sites -- to get the basics on the insect and the disease it can vector, how to inspect your trees, how to treat your tree if you find ACP, critical things to do to help contain the insect population and deal with Huanglongbing (HLB), as well as additional information more specific to California.
University of California - Riverside. Center for Invasive Species Research.
University of Vermont. Entomological Research Laboratory.
South Dakota State University. Agricultural Experiment Station; Cooperative Extension Service.

Vermont Department of Health.

State Agriculture and Health officials announced that the Asian Tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus) has been identified for the first time in Vermont. This normally tropical/subtropical species is a known disease vector for Zika, chikungunya and dengue viruses, infecting humans in countries where these diseases are present. The mosquitoes found in Vermont do not currently carry these viruses. Natalie Kwit, public health veterinarian with the Vermont Department of Health, said that while the discovery of Aedes albopictus in the state is notable, Vermont's climate is currently inhospitable for the mosquito species for most of the year, making it unlikely they will be spreading new diseases here any time soon. "The diseases they can carry are not endemic to our area, and in fact are rarely found anywhere in the United States," said Kwit. For more information, visit Vermont's Mosquito Surveillance Program.

University of California - Riverside. Center for Invasive Species Research.
University of California - Riverside. Center for Invasive Species Research.
Ohio State University. College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences.
San Diego County Agriculture Weights and Measures (California).

University of California - Davis. Agriculture and Natural Resources.

ANR Publication 8068
Lake Champlain Land Trust.
California Department of Food and Agriculture.
Cornell University. Agriculture and Life Sciences.
This guide provides photographs and descriptions of biological control (or biocontrol) agents of insect, disease, and weed pests in North America. It is also a tutorial on the concept and practice of biological control and integrated pest management (IPM). Whether you are an educator, a commercial grower, a student, a researcher, a land manager, or an extension or regulatory agent, we hope you will find this information useful.
Cornell University Cooperative Extension. Department of Natural Resources.
See also: ForestConnect Fact Sheet Series for more factsheets.