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Invasive Species Resources

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European Union. European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control.
United Kingdom Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs.
European Food Safety Authority.
Department for Environment Food and Rural Affairs (United Kingdom).
See also: Pest and Disease Factsheets for more fact sheets.
Mediterranean Science Commission.

European Alien Species Information Network.

Close to 7,000 different species are owned by pet owners across Europe, including mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, fish. Some of these pet species are imported from outside Europe and can potentially cause ecological problems if they escape or are released in the environment. The importation of some invasive alien species is prohibited (Council Regulation (EC) 338/97 (PDF | 3.78 MB)) due to their invasive character and the fact that their introduction has an adverse impact on native species. In addition, the Council of Europe has designed a voluntary code of conduct (PDF | 1.92 MB) to raise awareness within the pet industry and among owners and keepers of pets and provide practical guidance to reduce further the chances of pet species becoming invasive in Europe.

Ministry of Environment and Food of Denmark.
Környezetvédelmi és Vízügyi Minisztérium (Ministry of Environmental Protection and Water Resources, Hungary); National Ecological Network.

Cornwall County Council (United Kingdom).

Department for Environment Food and Rural Affairs (United Kingdom).
See also: Pest and Disease Factsheets for more fact sheets.

European Commission.

The EU Regulation on invasive alien species entered into force on 1 January 2015. At its core is this list of invasive alien species of Union concern, which has been drawn up on the basis of strict criteria and scientifically robust risk assessments, and approved by a Committee of Member State representatives.

European Commission. Joint Research Centre.

The JRC has developed a smartphone app that will help citizens to capture and share information about 37 invasive alien species of Union concern in Europe. The 'Invasive Alien Species Europe' app, which contains detailed information and photos of those plants and animals, makes it possible for citizens to use their phones' GPS system and camera to capture images of them.
European Alien Species Information Network.
A newly developed index identifies areas of the Mediterranean Sea which are most affected by non-native, invasive alien species introduced through the Suez Canal, by aquaculture or through shipping. The top invaders appear to be algae, according to the JRC study. The Cumulative Impact of Invasive Alien species (CIMPAL) index calculation brings together datasets on IAS distribution with literature information on the impacts of IAS on biodiversity.
Joint Nature Conservation Committee (United Kingdom).

Forestry Commission (United Kingdom). Forest Research.

Forestry Commission (United Kingdom). Forest Research.

Forestry Commission (United Kingdom). Forest Research.

Forestry Commission (United Kingdom). Forest Research.

Department for Environment Food and Rural Affairs (United Kingdom).
See also: Pest and Disease Factsheets for more fact sheets.