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Invasive Species Resources

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Maryland Department of Natural Resources.

Do you hike, ride, bird, camp, fish, or otherwise recreate in state parks, forests or wildlands? Lend YOUR eyes to help Maryland's biodiversity! The Maryland Natural Heritage Program designed Statewide Eyes to allow volunteers and researchers alike to collect more information about invasive plants on state lands quickly. Volunteers (like you!) use a free mobile application called the Mid-Atlantic Early Detection Network (MAEDN) to identify, photograph and map the location of invasive plants, focusing on ecologically significant sites.

North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Plant Industry Division. Plant Protection Section.
Maryland Department of Agriculture. Plant Industries and Pest Management.
North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. North Carolina Forest Service.
Thousand cankers disease is a fungal disease of walnuts (Juglans spp.) that is carried from tree to tree by a small bark beetle called the walnut twig beetle (Pityophthorus juglandis). It has killed countless ornamental black walnut trees in the western U.S. and was found for the first time in the eastern U.S. in 2010. The first recorded incident of thousand cankers disease in North Carolina (Haywood County) was confirmed in late fall, 2012. Please report the location and descriptions of potentially positive trees to 1-800-206-9333 or newpest@ncagr.gov.
Maryland Department of Natural Resources. Forest Service.
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.
Maryland Department of Agriculture.
Thousand cankers disease (TCD) is a disease complex native to the western United States and primarily affects black walnut, Juglans nigra. This disease is the result of the combined activity of a fungus, Geosmithia morbida, and the walnut twig beetle WTB), Pityophthorus juglandis. On January 12, 2015, the the Maryland Secretary of Agriculture issued a quarantine order (PDF | 91 KB) to minimize the risk of moving infested material out of the limited action area in Cecil County, and to provide confidence in Maryland walnut products moving into neighboring states from non quarantined areas.
North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality. Water Resources.

Maryland Department of Natural Resources.

North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. North Carolina Forest Service.
Emerald ash borer, laurel wilt disease, thousand cankers disease, and the European gypsy moth are likely to be brought into North Carolina in or on firewood. The use of local firewood is an important factor in preventing the spread of potentially devastating invasive species to our state's forests. Please keep this in mind as you prepare for your outdoor recreation activities. See Forest Health Invasive Pest Maps for more information about pest monitoring.
Google. YouTube; Maryland Department of Natural Resources. Fisheries.
Google. YouTube; New York Department of Environmental Conservation.