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Invasive Species Resources

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Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant College Program.
Much needed attention has been directed at some particularly problematic aquatic invasive species in the Great Lakes, such as Asian carps and zebra and quagga mussels. But others invaders, like crayfish, can also take their toll on the lakes. Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant (IISG) has created a new collaborative that brings together a variety of experts and stakeholders to address the threat of invasive crayfish. The Invasive Crayfish Collaborative (ICC), includes 68 experts and other stakeholders from government agencies, universities, non-profit organizations, and private businesses to combine resources and expertise to address priority invasive crayfish research and outreach needs.
Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology.
Note: Nesting Behavior
Cornell University (New York). New York State Agricultural Experiment Station.
Cornell University. Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County. Horticulture Diagnostic Laboratory.
See also: Tree and Shrub Disease for more fact sheets.
University of Wisconsin Sea Grant.
The Aquatic Invaders Attack Pack is filled with materials to help teach groups about Great Lakes aquatic invasive species (AIS), the problems they cause and what can be done about them. Each pack includes preserved specimens of some of the most problematic AIS in the Great Lakes, rugged plastic fact sheets and a classroom guide. Additional materials are available for download.
eXtension.

eXtension is an educational partnership of more than 70 universities to help you improve your life every day with access to objective, research-based information and educational opportunities. Categories include integrated pest management and fire ants. Requires free registration.
See also: Use the One Search service to search the resources provided by your Cooperative Extension Service using a Google Custom Search Engine that includes many of the Cooperative Extension web sites provided by your Land-Grant institutions.

Virginia Tech; Virginia State University. Virginia Cooperative Extension.
This Best Management Practice document is a set of guidelines for home growers of landscape boxwood to avoid introduction of the boxwood blight pathogen into a landscape or, if the disease is already present in a landscape, to manage the disease in the most effective manner and avoid spread of the disease to new locations. See also: Resources for Plant Diseases for more publications
Cornell University. Agriculture and Life Sciences.
This guide provides photographs and descriptions of biological control (or biocontrol) agents of insect, disease, and weed pests in North America. It is also a tutorial on the concept and practice of biological control and integrated pest management (IPM). Whether you are an educator, a commercial grower, a student, a researcher, a land manager, or an extension or regulatory agent, we hope you will find this information useful.
Cornell University Cooperative Extension. Department of Natural Resources.
See also: ForestConnect Fact Sheet Series for more factsheets.
Virginia Tech; Virginia State University. Virginia Cooperative Extension.
Boxwood blight (also called "box blight" in Europe), caused by the fungal pathogen Cylindrocladium pseudonaviculatum (=C. buxicola), was found for the first time in the United States in North Carolina, Virginia and Connecticut in 2011. The first reported infestation in the U.S. was in a North Carolina nursery and the disease was introduced to Virginia on plants from that nursery. Spread outside the two Virginia locations, both of which are fields owned by a single nursery, has not been reported. However, growers should be aware of the symptoms of boxwood blight and monitor nursery and landscape boxwoods for symptoms.

University of Maryland. Home and Garden Information Center.

University of Maryland Extension.

See also: Pest Threats for more fact sheets

North Carolina State University. Cooperative Extension.
Pennsylvania State University. Pennsylvania Sea Grant.
Pennsylvania and New York Sea Grants worked together with funding from the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative to compile 10 lesson plans focusing on the potential interactions between aquatic invasive species and the changing climate.