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Invasive Species Resources

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Texas Parks and Wildlife Department.

For the first time, Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD) biologists have confirmed the disease white-nose syndrome (WNS) in a Texas bat. Up until this point, while the fungus that causes the disease was previously detected in Texas in 2017, there were no signs of the disease it can cause. WNS has killed millions of hibernating bats in the eastern parts of the United States, raising national concern. WNS is a fungal disease only known to occur in bats and is not a risk to people. However, bats are wild animals and should not be handled by untrained individuals. The public is encouraged to report dead or sick bats to TPWD at nathan.fuller@tpwd.texas.gov for possible testing.

Tennessee Bat Working Group.
White-nose Syndrome is a mysterious disease that is killing bats across the northeast United States. Many research projects are underway to help in the fight against WNS, from researching fungicides to modeling the spread and affects of the syndrome. If you would like to help there are many ways in which you can:
  • Report any unusual bat activity (bats flying in the daytime) or unexplained bat deaths to your regional TWRA office. Or check out the Report a Bat Link on this website.
  • Donate to a number of funds collecting money for WNS research (see National Speleological Society and Bat Conservation International pages below).
  • Adhere to state and federal cave closure advisories.
  • Encourage state and federal agencies to assist in WNS research and monitoring activities.
Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries.
Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency.
Missouri Department of Conservation.
Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries.
Provides guidelines for hunters and individuals finding dead birds
Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries.
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. Virginia Forest Landowner Education Program.
See also: Publications - Exotic Invasives for more fact sheets

Google. YouTube;Oregon State University. Extension Service.

Google. YouTube; United States Navy.

Google. YouTube; Texas A&M University. Extension.

Google. YouTube; New York State Flower Industries.

Google. YouTube; Texas AgriLife Extension Service.

Google. YouTube; Texas A&M University.
Texas AgriLife Extension Service.
Google. YouTube; Texas A&M University. Texas AgriLife Extension Service.
Google. YouTube; University of Guam. Sea Grant Program.
Google. YouTube; Greater Caddo Lake Association (Texas).

Google. YouTube; New York Department of Environmental Conservation.

Google. YouTube; Smithsonian Channel.

Google. YouTube; Herndon Environmental Network.