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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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USDA. FS. Northeastern Area State and Private Forestry.

The Gypsy Moth Digest is a database containing information about gypsy moth defoliation and treatments at the national level. Treatments include those funded by the gypsy moth Suppression, Eradication, and Slow The Spread (STS) programs.

USDA. Forest Service; Southern Regional Extension Forestry. Forest Health Program.

See also: Gypsy Moth for more resources

Environmental Law Institute.
A report by attorney Read D. Porter that examines coordination on aquatic invasive species (AIS) prevention among the Chesapeake Bay states. The report focuses on prevention-related legal authorities in Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania in particular, and recommends actions to improve regional cooperation both within the existing regulatory frameworks and through potential amendments to state laws and regulations to enhance prevention.
New York City Department of Health.

Lake Champlain Basin Program.

Maryland Department of Agriculture.

University of Maryland. Cooperative Extension. Home and Garden Information Center.

Cornell University. Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County. Horticulture Diagnostic Laboratory.
See also: Tree and Shrub Insect Pests for more fact sheets.
USDA. FS. Northeastern Area State and Private Forestry.
Provides distribution maps and predicted future range expansion.
University of Idaho.
Cornell University Cooperative Extension. Oneida County.
See also: Home and Garden - Weeds for more fact sheets

USDA. FS. Northeastern Area State and Private Forestry.

USDA. FS. Northeastern Area State and Private Forestry.

USDA. FS. Northeastern Area State and Private Forestry.

Idaho State Department of Agriculture. Invasive Species/Noxious Weeds Program.

Idaho Weed Awareness Campaign.

Idaho State Department of Agriculture.

The primary purpose of the Idaho State Department of Agriculture's (ISDA's) noxious weed cost share grant program is to accelerate the attack on invasive weeds by supplementing local funds and resources, not replacing them. Cost sharing is also intended to provide additional incentives for local landowners, officials, and citizens to work collaboratively to develop a more comprehensive and effective noxious weed management program.

University of Idaho Extension.
This pocket guide has color photographs of all the weeds on Idaho's official noxious weeds list. Inside find maps showing each weed's distribution by county, leaf shape illustrations to aid in identification, and features to help distinguish the weeds from similar-looking plants.

University of Wyoming. Wyoming Public Media.

Images of this year’s most devastating wildfires across the West have shown forests of ponderosa, spruce and lodgepole engulfed in flames. Fires on grasslands and rangelands may not capture as much coverage, but can be just as landscape-altering as forest fires. Plus, they can spread more rapidly, and in some cases, cause more damage than fires in forested areas. Across the West, the increasing prevalence of invasive plants, and the growing influence of climate change, is changing the relationship between vast rangelands, drought, and wildfire.