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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Lake George Association (New York).
Maryland Department of Agriculture.

New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets.

University of Maryland Extension.

See also: Pest Threats for more fact sheets

Great Lakes Fishery Commission. Fisheries Management.

DOI. NPS. Science of the American Southwest.

See also: Invasive Plant Species for more fact sheets

DOI. NPS. Science of the American Southwest.

See also: Invasive Plant Species for more fact sheets.

DOI. NPS. Science of the American Southwest.

See also: Fact Sheets for Invasive Exotic Plants for more fact sheets

DOI. NPS. Science of the American Southwest.

See also: Invasive Plant Species for more fact sheets

DOI. NPS. Science of the American Southwest.

See also: Invasive Plant Species for more fact sheets
University of Idaho. Extension.

Chesapeake Bay Program.

Chesapeake Bay Program.

Chesapeake Bay Program.

Chesapeake Bay Program.

USDA. FS. Southern Research Station.

Provides field notes on forest pest research, including invasive pests.
Note: Content is also available by email subscription.

United States Department of Agriculture.

Cattle grazing on a nearly half mile wide targeted strip of cheatgrass near Beowawe, Nevada, created a firebreak that helped limit a rangeland fire to just 54 acres this past August compared to rangeland fires that more commonly race across thousands of acres of the Great Basin. This "targeted grazing" firebreak and eight others are part of an evaluation project being managed by the Agricultural Research Service (ARS), partnering with other federal, state and local agencies and local cattle ranchers in Idaho, Nevada and Oregon. These demonstration sites are being studied so the concept's efficacy and environmental impacts can be uniformly evaluated and compared.

Cheatgrass, also known as downy brome, is an invasive annual that dominates more than 100 million acres of the Great Basin in the western U.S. Germinating each winter, cheatgrass grows furiously in spring and dies in early summer, leaving the range carpeted in golden dry tinder. The Great Basin now has the nation's highest wildfire risk, and rangeland fires are outpacing forest fires when it comes to acreage destroyed.

Maryland Department of Agriculture.

The Maryland Department of Agriculture has confirmed that a single adult spotted lanternfly has been found on a trap in the northeast corner of Cecil County near the border of Pennsylvania and Delaware. This is the first confirmed sighting of the invasive species in Maryland, and the department does not believe there is an established population of the pest in the state. If you suspect you have found a spotted lantern fly egg mass, nymph, or adult, snap a picture of it, collect it, put it in a plastic bag, freeze it, and report it to the Maryland Department of Agriculture at DontBug.MD@maryland.gov.