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Invasive Species Resources

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New York Invasive Species Awareness Week.
The mission of the New York Invasive Species Awareness Week (ISAW) is to promote knowledge and understanding of invasive species and the harm they can cause by engaging citizens in a wide range of activities across the state, and empowering them to take action to help stop the spread. This annual education campaign is comprised of various outreach initiatives and events led by partner organizations statewide. Activities include interpretive hikes, invasive plant removal, and restoration projects, displays, webinars, radio and television programming, and more.
University of Minnesota. Minnesota Aquatic Invasive Species Research Center.
Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program.
University of Minnesota. Minnesota Aquatic Invasive Species Research Center.
Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology.
Note: Nesting Behavior
West Virginia Department of Natural Resources.
Anglers are reminded that West Virginia law prohibits the release of fish or other aquatic organisms into public waters, unless a stocking permit is issued by the Director of the Division of Natural Resources. Stocking permits are not required for trout and black bass stocking provided that disease-free certifications are obtained prior to stocking, or if trout originate from a source within the state. A permit is not required for stocking native or established fish into privately owned ponds. For more information on aquatic nuisance species please visit Stop Aquatic Hitchhikers!.
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.

Potomac Highlands Cooperative Weed and Pest Management Area.

This annual event calls for volunteer to help pull garlic mustard in sites in Tennessee and West Virginia. Garlic Mustard has gained much attention in recent years for its ability to rapidly invade wooded habitats from disturbed areas. Garlic mustard is highly invasive and threatens the abundant wildflowers and diverse forest ecosystem of West Virginia, Virginia, Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois. The CWPMA serves Grant, Hardy, and Pendleton Counties in West Virginia and Highland County in Virginia.
Cornell University (New York). New York State Agricultural Experiment Station.
Cornell University. Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County. Horticulture Diagnostic Laboratory.
See also: Tree and Shrub Disease for more fact sheets.
University of Minnesota. Minnesota Sea Grant.
University of Minnesota. Minnesota Sea Grant.
AIS-HACCP is a self-inspection system for reducing the risk of spreading aquatic invasive species through aquaculture, hatchery, scientific, natural resource, and baitfish harvesting activities. This adaptable way to protect waterways from unwanted species was derived from HACCP methods required for the seafood industry and builds on Sea Grant’s success in assisting industry compliance.

Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.

Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.
An affirmation card reminds boaters and nonresident anglers of Minnesota’s aquatic invasive species laws. Watercraft owners and nonresident anglers must read and sign the affirmation during their regular license renewal, then keep it in their possession with their license. The affirmation, enacted by the Minnesota Legislature, is another positive step in the state’s proactive efforts to keep 95% of Minnesota lakes off the infested waters list.
New York Department of Environmental Conservation.
Outreach and education is the most effective way to combat the spread of aquatic invasive species. The more people are made aware of the necessity of cleaning and drying boating and fishing equipment before using it in another waterbody, the less likely the aquatic invasive species will be spread to new waters. The following guidance/reminder sign templates are provided for you to download and use at private access points.
Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.
Outreach materials are provided to help organizations and individuals promote aquatic invasive species (AIS) prevention activities in their communities. Minnesota DNR's Invasive Species Program provides printed materials and design files, as well as providing review of AIS materials created by other organizations.
University of Vermont. Entomological Research Laboratory.

Vermont Department of Health.

State Agriculture and Health officials announced that the Asian Tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus) has been identified for the first time in Vermont. This normally tropical/subtropical species is a known disease vector for Zika, chikungunya and dengue viruses, infecting humans in countries where these diseases are present. The mosquitoes found in Vermont do not currently carry these viruses. Natalie Kwit, public health veterinarian with the Vermont Department of Health, said that while the discovery of Aedes albopictus in the state is notable, Vermont's climate is currently inhospitable for the mosquito species for most of the year, making it unlikely they will be spreading new diseases here any time soon. "The diseases they can carry are not endemic to our area, and in fact are rarely found anywhere in the United States," said Kwit. For more information, visit Vermont's Mosquito Surveillance Program.