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Invasive Species Resources

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New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse.

New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse.
People have been working to control aquatic invasive species in New York State for decades. In 2003, the state government took a leadership effort to identify and coordinate local and regional efforts. The Watercraft Inspection Steward Programs are a statewide effort that has stewards stationed at boat launches across the state, including Lake Erie, Lake Ontario, the Finger Lakes, the Thousand Islands, the Adirondacks, Lake Champlain, Lake George, Saratoga Lake, the Hudson River and on Long Island.
Cornell University. College of Agriculture and Life Sciences.
Cornell University. College of Agriculture and Life Sciences.

North Dakota State University.

A North Dakota Emerald Ash Borer First Detector Program has been cooperatively developed by the North Dakota Forest Service, North Dakota State University, North Dakota Department of Agriculture, National Plant Diagnostic Network and the USDA APHIS Plant Protection and Quarantine to train citizens of North Dakota to correctly identify symptoms and signs of EAB. If you are interested in becoming an EAB first detector in North Dakota, contact Aaron.D.Bergdahl(at)ndsu.edu. Also available is the 2014 Emerald Ash Borer First Detector Manual (PDF | 33.7 MB).

Northeast Marine Introduced Species.
Regional Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Centers

The four Regional Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Centers serve as a hub for multi-state partnerships and communication networks, linking researchers, growers, extension educators, commodity organizations, environmental groups, pest control professionals, government agencies and others.

The four Regional IPM Centers serve as a hub for multi-state partnerships and communication networks, linking researchers, growers, extension educators, commodity organizations, environmental groups, pest control professionals, government agencies and others. The regions include: Northern IPM Center, Southern IPM Center, North Central IPM Center, and the Western IPM Center.

Northeast Climate Adaptation Science Center.
Invasive species and climate change represent two of the five major global change threats to ecosystems. An emerging initiative of the Northeast Climate Adaptation Science Center aims to develop management-relevant research to improve invasive species management in the face of climate change. Through working groups, information sharing and targeted research, this project addresses the information needs of invasive species managers in the context of climate change.
Northeastern Integrated Pest Management Center.
What will the changes in climate mean for the distribution and occurrences of pests? What tools will help in addressing the needs? The Northeastern IPM Center is partnering with other leading organizations on initiatives related to climate change and pests.
Northeastern Integrated Pest Management Center. Stop BMSB.
USDA. National Institute of Food and Agriculture; University of New Hampshire.
Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have found a dramatic decline of 14 wild bee species that are, among other things, important across the Northeast for the pollination of major local crops like apples, blueberries and cranberries.

“We know that wild bees are greatly at risk and not doing well worldwide,” said Sandra Rehan, assistant professor of biological sciences. “This status assessment of wild bees shines a light on the exact species in decline, beside the well-documented bumble bees. Because these species are major players in crop pollination, it raises concerns about compromising the production of key crops and the food supply in general.”

Lake Champlain Basin Program.