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Invasive Species Resources

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Cornell University Cooperative Extension. Department of Natural Resources.
See also: ForestConnect Fact Sheet Series for more factsheets.

University of Georgia. Extension.

Bulletin 1209.

New York Department of Environmental Conservation.
New Hampshire Department of Agriculture, Markets, and Food.
Boxwood blight is a disease affecting plants in the family Buxaceae including boxwoods (Buxus), Pachysandra, and Sarcococca plants. First detected in the U.S. in 2011, it has since been found in multiple states and provinces from the East Coast to the West Coast. Boxwood blight has now been confirmed on boxwood nursery stock in New Hampshire. New Hampshire nurseries, landscapers, town officials and residents responsible for boxwood plantings should learn the symptoms associated with boxwood blight. Watch for black lesions on stems, "zonate" brown spots on leaves leading to chlorosis, and leaf drop. If boxwood blight is suspected on recently purchased boxwoods, or plants in proximity to recently purchased boxwoods, please contact the Division and collect a sample for analysis by the UNH Plant Diagnostic Lab.
New Hampshire Department of Transportation.
To address mounting concerns over invasive plants and the role NHDOT activities play in the spread of these plants along roadsides, Best Management Practices (BMPs) have been developed with input from Maintenance Districts, the Roadside Development Section, the Bureau of Construction, and the NH Department of Agriculture. Implementation of these BMPs will help prevent the spread of invasive plants caused by maintenance and construction activities.
New Hampshire Division of Forests and Lands.
USDA. FS. Southern Research Station. CompassLive.
Catskills Regional Invasive Species Partnership.
Smithsonian Institution. Smithsonian Environmental Research Center. Marine Invasions Research Lab. National Exotic Marine and Estuarine Species Information System (NEMESIS).
DOI. Fish and Wildlife Service. Chesapeake Bay Field Office.
New York Department of Environmental Conservation.

USDA. Forest Service; Southern Regional Extension Forestry. Forest Health Program.

See also: Chinese Tallow Tree for more resources

New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services. Coastal Program.

Native Plant Trust (Massachusetts).

Formerly the New England Wild Flower Society.
U.S. Government Printing Office. Federal Depository Library Program Electronic Collection Archive.
Compiled and Edited by: Gregory Ruiz and David Reid, NOAA Technical Memorandum GLERL-142.
See also: GLERL Technical Reports for more reports
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.
The New York State Departments of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and Agriculture and Markets (DAM) today confirmed that spotted lanternfly (SLF), an invasive pest from Asia, has been found in Albany and Yates counties. A single adult insect was discovered in a vehicle in the Capital District. In addition, a single adult insect was reported on a private Keuka Lake property in Penn Yan, Yates County. Anyone that suspects they have found SLF is encouraged to send a photo to spottedlanternfly@dec.ny.gov. Please note the location of where the insect was found, egg masses, and/or infestation signs. DEC and DAM also encourage the public to inspect outdoor items such as vehicles, furniture, and firewood for egg masses. Anyone that visits the Pennsylvania or New Jersey Quarantine Areas should thoroughly inspect their vehicle, luggage and gear for SLF and egg masses before leaving and scrape off all egg masses.
Blue Accounting.
The species watch list identifies species that are likely to have a high or moderate ecological and/or socioeconomic impact if they established in or spread to new locations in the Great Lakes Basin. The watch list was compiled using several regional risk assessment sources and was developed as part of the Aquatic Invasive Species Interstate Surveillance Framework for the U.S. Waters of the Great Lakes.

USDA. Forest Service; Southern Regional Extension Forestry. Forest Health Program.