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Invasive Species Resources

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North Carolina State University. Cooperative Extension. Going Native: Urban Landscaping for Wildlife with Native Plants.
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture, Food, and Environment. Entomology.
University of Delaware. Cooperative Extension.
See also: Weed Management Guides for more species
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture.
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture. Entomology.
Officials with the Office of the State Entomologist in the University of Kentucky Entomology Department on May 22, 2009 announced two confirmed occurrences in Kentucky of emerald ash borer, an invasive insect pest of ash trees. These are the first findings of this destructive insect in the state.
Southeast Exotic Pest Plant Council.
Kentucky Exotic Pest Plant Council.
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture. Division of Regulatory Services.
North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Plant Industry Division. Plant Protection Section.
See also: Hot Pest Topics for more factsheets
Lake George Park Commission.
From May 1st - Oct. 31st, all trailered boats being launched must be inspected at one of the 7 regional inspection stations.
Virginia Tech; Virginia State University. Virginia Cooperative Extension.
North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. North Carolina Forest Service.
North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Plant Industry Division. Plant Protection Section.
Virginia Tech; Virginia State University. Virginia Cooperative Extension.
See also: Resources for Agricultural Insects Pests for more factsheets
Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.
In May of 2018, the National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Ames, Iowa confirmed the finding of the Haemaphysalis longicornis tick (otherwise known as the East Asian or Longhorned tick) in Virginia. It was previously unknown in the state, but since then has been detected in 24 counties, mostly in the western part of the state. "The tiny tick can appear on cows, horses and other livestock," said State Veterinarian Dr. Charles Broaddus. "In addition to being a nuisance, they also can be a health risk, especially to newborn or young animals." If you believe you have found the Longhorned tick, notify your local office of the Cooperative Extension Service.
North Carolina State University. Cooperative Extension.
New York State Department of Health.
Virginia Department of Health.
In November of 2017, a tick species previously unknown to the US called Haemaphysalis longicornis, or the Asian longhorned tick, was discovered both on a sheep and in a pasture in New Jersey. Since then, this new tick species has been found in eight additional states, including 17 counties and one city in Virginia.

Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program.

The Nature Conservancy's Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program (APIPP) is celebrating its 20th anniversary by launching a new public awareness campaign focused on the simple steps Adirondack residents and visitors can take to prevent invasive species from spreading into the places they love. The "Keep Invasive Species Out" campaign is centered around a new website, KeepInvasiveSpeciesOut.com, that provides an overview of the problem and offers simple, preventive solutions for limiting the likelihood of unintentionally spreading an invasive. Tips are given for specific outdoor activities, including hiking, camping, boating, fishing, hunting, mountain biking, horseback riding, gardening/landscaping, and farming.