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Invasive Species Resources

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Texas A&M University. Entomology.
Cornell University. Agriculture and Life Sciences.
This guide provides photographs and descriptions of biological control (or biocontrol) agents of insect, disease, and weed pests in North America. It is also a tutorial on the concept and practice of biological control and integrated pest management (IPM). Whether you are an educator, a commercial grower, a student, a researcher, a land manager, or an extension or regulatory agent, we hope you will find this information useful.
Cornell University Cooperative Extension. Department of Natural Resources.
See also: ForestConnect Fact Sheet Series for more factsheets.
New York Department of Environmental Conservation.
Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture.
Pennsylvania State University. Cooperative Extension.
Pennsylvania State University. College of Agricultural Sciences. Entomology.
Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture.
The Bureau of Animal Health and Diagnostic Services (BAHDS) is responsible for controlling and eradicating diseases in livestock and poultry. This mission is critical since these diseases have the potential to impact human health and cause significant economic loss to farmers and the commonwealth. In addition, BAHDS administers regulatory programs for animal health certification, containment of diseased animals and elimination of disease agents.
Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture.
The Bureau of Plant Industry provides services to maintain and protect Pennsylvania agriculture through both consumer protection and product regulation.
Catskills Regional Invasive Species Partnership.
Texas A&M University. Texas Forest Service.
See also: Texas Forestry Association's "Dirty Dozen" (scroll to view) for more fact sheets
New York Department of Environmental Conservation.
Alabama Department of Agriculture & Industries.
A plant disease that presents a serious threat to the U.S. citrus industry has been detected in Alabama. Federal and state plant health officials have confirmed the identification of citrus greening (CG), also known as Huanglongbing or HLB, which is caused by the bacterial pathogen Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus. This is the first confirmation of citrus greening in Alabama despite biannual surveys for the pathogen by the Alabama Department of Agriculture and Industries (ADAI).

Texas A&M University. AgriLife Extension Service.

See also: Citrus Publications for more resources

Alabama Cooperative Extension System.

Pennsylvania State University. School of Forest Resources.

Alabama Cooperative Extension System.
Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management. Agriculture.