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Invasive Species Resources

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Oklahoma State University. Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service.
See also: Plant Diseases-Topical for more fact sheets
Lake George Association (New York).
Oklahoma State University. Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources.
Texas Parks and Wildlife Department.
Texas Parks and Wildlife Department.
Texas Animal Health Commission.
See also: Poultry Health for more diseases
TexasInvasives.org.
The Invaders of Texas Program is an innovative campaign whereby volunteer "citizen scientists" are trained to detect the arrival and dispersal of invasive species in their own local areas. That information is delivered into a statewide mapping database and to those who can do something about it. The premise is simple. The more trained eyes watching for invasive species, the better our chances of lessening or avoiding damage to our native landscape.
Texas Parks and Wildlife.
Oklahoma State University. Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology.
Note: Maps of potential range expansion for the red imported fire ant in Oklahoma and the United States
New York Codes, Rules, and Regulations.
Texas A&M University. Center for Urban and Structural Entomology.
St. Lawrence - Eastern Lake Ontario Partnership For Regional Invasive Species Management (New York).
St. Lawrence - Eastern Lake Ontario Partnership For Regional Invasive Species Management (New York).
New York State. Governor Andew Cuomo.
Funding Supports Invasive Species Rapid Response and Control, Research, Lake Management Planning, and Aquatic Invasive Species Spread Prevention Programs. Governor Andrew M. Cuomo today announced more than $2.8 million in grants have been awarded to 42 projects that will reduce the negative impacts of invasive species through control or removal activities, research, and spread prevention. These grants are part of the State Department of Environmental Conservation's Invasive Species Grant Program and are funded by the State's Environmental Protection Fund.  
Gulf States Marine Fisheries Commission.
Texas State Historical Association.
New York City Department of Health.
TexasInvasives.org.
Zebra mussels are a small, destructive invasive species that can spread across Texas by hitching a ride on boats and trailers. Zebra mussels can cause tremendous environmental and economic damage - hurting aquatic life, damaging your boat, hindering water recreation and even threatening your water supply. In the state's ongoing effort to combat the spread of invasive zebra mussels, new rules effective July 1, 2014 require that all boats operating on public fresh water anywhere in Texas be drained after use.
Cornell University. Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County. Horticulture Diagnostic Laboratory.
See also: Tree and Shrub Insect Pests for more fact sheets.