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Invasive Species Resources

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Lake George Association (New York).
Wyoming State Forestry Division.
Emerald ash borer (EAB) was confirmed in Boulder County, Colorado in September 2013. This marks the first time EAB has been detected in Colorado as well as the first detection of EAB in any western state. EAB has not been detected in Wyoming. See Forest Health Management for related EAB information.
South Dakota Department of Agriculture.
The South Dakota Department of Agriculture (SDDA) has confirmed that an infestation of emerald ash borer (EAB) has been discovered in northern Sioux Falls. This is the first confirmed infestation in South Dakota. Emerald ash borer is an invasive insect that has killed tens of millions of ash trees in at least 32 states. On May 9, 2018, Secretary Mike Jaspers implemented an Emergency Plant Pest Quarantine in order to prevent or reduce the spread of the EAB. This emergency quarantine is effective immediately. For more information, see the Emerald Ash Borer in South Dakota website.
South Dakota Department of Agriculture.

New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets.

South Dakota Animal Industry Board.
See also: Avian Health for more information
Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Plant and Pest Services.
Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation. Virginia State Parks.
Invasive insect pests and diseases are threatening the future forests of Virginia. The transport of firewood is one of the primary means by which these harmful insects and diseases spread. Quarantines have been issued by the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services to restrict the movement of firewood from counties where the pests have been found to counties without them.
DOI. NPS. Yellowstone National Park.
New York Codes, Rules, and Regulations.
South Dakota Department of Agriculture. Conservation and Forestry.
Forest health management in South Dakota encompasses a wide array of growing conditions, management practices and host species.
Virginia Department of Forestry.
Utah Department of Natural Resources. Division of Forestry, Fire and State Lands.

Wyoming State Forestry Division.

Fremont County Weed and Pest Control (Wyoming).

St. Lawrence - Eastern Lake Ontario Partnership For Regional Invasive Species Management (New York).

St. Lawrence - Eastern Lake Ontario Partnership For Regional Invasive Species Management (New York).

St. Lawrence - Eastern Lake Ontario Partnership For Regional Invasive Species Management (New York).

DOI. NPS. Glen Canyon National Recreation Area.
Quagga mussel larvae, or veligers, were first confirmed in Lake Powell in late 2012 after routine water monitoring tests discovered mussel DNA in water samples taken from the vicinity of Antelope Point and the Glen Canyon Dam. As of early 2016, thousands of adult quagga mussels have been found in Lake Powell, attached to canyon walls, the Glen Canyon Dam, boats, and other underwater structures, especially in the southern portions of the lake. It is crucial to keep the mussels from moving from Lake Powell to other lakes and rivers. Utah and Arizona state laws require you to clean, drain, and dry your boat when leaving Lake Powell using self-decontamination procedures.