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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources (alphabetically), with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Invasive Carp Regional Coordinating Committee.

The Asian Carp Regional Coordinating Committee announced the release of its 2021 Asian Carp Action Plan, a comprehensive portfolio of projects focused on Great Lakes protection.

Great Lakes Commission.

The Great Lakes Phragmites Collaborative is a network of agencies, organizations and citizens who are engaged in Phragmites in some way, including management, research and communication. The Collaborative was established to facilitate communication among stakeholders across the region and serve as a resource center for information on Phragmites biology, management, and research.

See also: Phragmites Adaptive Management Framework (PAMF) Strategic Plan (2020-2026). This strategic plan will guide successful implementation of PAMF by setting program-specific goals, objectives, and measures for the next five years. The PAMF core science team that developed the plan includes representatives from the Great Lakes Commission, U.S. Geological Survey, and University of Georgia.

Great Lakes Commission; Invasive Mussel Collaborative.

The Invasive Mussel Collaborative announced today that it has released a new strategy to reduce invasive mussels and their negative impacts. The Strategy to Advance Management of Invasive Zebra and Quagga Mussels is intended to drive investments, policy, and research around invasive mussels across the Great Lakes region and beyond. Since their initial discovery in 1989, zebra and quagga mussels have had dramatic impacts on the Great Lakes ecosystem and economy, including changes to the food web, degrading fish habitat, interfering with drinking water systems and damaging tourism and recreation economies. Today, these mussels continue to spread to new water bodies across the U.S. and Canada.

DOC. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; New Hampshire Sea Grant; MIT Sea Grant; Maine Sea Grant.

The Rapid Response Plan for Management and Control of the Chinese Mitten Crab is intended to guide efforts to mitigate the further introduction and spread of the Chinese mitten crab in the northeastern United States and Canada. Due to the unique challenges of invasive species introductions to marine and coastal ecosystems, the mitten crab and other existing and potential marine invasive species are more difficult and often more costly to manage or control than freshwater aquatic or terrestrial invasive species. This document focuses on the use of early detection and rapid response as a tool to prevent the introduction and spread of Chinese mitten crabs and other crabs belonging to the genus Eriocheir throughout northeastern United States and Atlantic Canada. The primary goal of this plan is to provide information needed to support local, state, and regional efforts to prevent and control the spread of Chinese mitten crabs throughout northeastern United States and Atlantic Canada. For more information on the development of this plan, see Early Detection and Rapid Response Plan for the Invasive Chinese Mitten Crab.

Western Regional Panel on Aquatic Nuisance Species.

The Western Regional Panel prepared Quagga and Zebra Mussel Action Plan 2.0 to inform ongoing management and partnership efforts intended to minimize the spread and impacts from zebra and quagga mussels in the western United States. The original QZAP action items have guided prevention, containment, research, and management to address the ecological and economic impacts of invasive quagga and zebra mussels since 2009. The purpose of QZAP 2.0 is to provide a systematic and unified approach to prevent the spread of zebra and quagga mussels into and within the western United States in the future. The urgency and the need for such a coordinated approach remain as important today as ever before. Newly infested waters, increased boating pressure, and gained public and political awareness drove the need for the Western Regional Panel to acknowledge and learn from the past and set forth a new collective path towards the future. These recommendations are intended to inform decision-making to provide increased capacity and clear direction that empowers the further implementation of a collaborative and coordinated multi-jurisdictional regional strategy to prevent the spread of quagga and zebra mussels in the West. For more resources, see: Key Documents