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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources (alphabetically), with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Mississippi River Basin Panel on Aquatic Nuisance Species.
Rapid response actions are often complex, costly, and controversial, and therefore advanced planning for rapid response prior to an introduction is crucial. The Mississippi River Basin Panel on AIS (MRBP) has developed this model rapid response plan and supplemental attachments to assist natural resources management agencies effectively plan and quickly implement rapid response actions. In addition to providing information on rapid response planning, the model plan includes a template that can be used by states in developing their own rapid response plans. See also: MRBP Documents for more resources.

Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program.

Pennsylvania State University. Cooperative Extension.

Aquatic Invaders in the Marketplace.

Predicting the next invasive species allows us to take action before they reach our waterways—an economically and environmentally smarter approach than responding after they’ve arrived. To get a jump on potential invaders, scientists have developed methods that pinpoint the risk a species poses to specific environments based on factors like history of invasion, its ability to survive in similar habitats, and how difficult it is to control. Using these tools and the information they provide, natural resource managers, environmental educators, and individuals who buy and sell live aquatic organisms can make more informed decisions on how to protect their waterways from potential AIM.

Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission.

See also: Aquatic Invasive Species for more action plans

Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission.

See also: Aquatic Invasive Species for more action plans

Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission.

See also: Aquatic Invasive Species for more action plans

Alabama Cooperative Extension System.

Southeast Exotic Pest Plant Council.

USDA. FS. Northern Research Station.

Select the non-indigenous forest pest to view maps depicting state and county distribution. Produced by: USDA, FS, Forest Health Protection, and its partners.

USDA. FS. Northern Research Station.

Georgia Department of Agriculture.

New York Department of Environmental Conservation.

Cornell University (New York). New York State Agricultural Experiment Station.

USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

The United States Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has analyzed the potential environmental effects of establishing an integrated management strategy to control cogongrass in Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, and South Carolina. The draft environmental assessment is now available for comment. Cogongrass is an invasive exotic grass found on public and private property, along roadways, in forests, and on farmland. This federally regulated noxious weed grows rapidly, reducing forest productivity, harming wildlife habitat and ecosystems, and encroaching on pastures and hayfields. Because of cogongrass' impact on agriculture and forest industries, Congress has given APHIS funding to partner with Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, and South Carolina to control the spread of this weed. APHIS is proposing is an integrated management strategy that uses preventive, cultural, mechanical, biological, and chemical methods to control cogongrass in key areas of its distribution. APHIS invites the public to review and comment on this environmental assessment by April 1, 2020.

DOC. NOAA. National Marine Fisheries Service. West Coast Region.

Northeast Aquatic Nuisance Species Panel.
Contains a compilation of known control methods for selected aquatic and wetland nuisance species.

Invasive Carp Regional Coordinating Committee.

The Asian Carp Regional Coordinating Committee announced the release of its 2021 Asian Carp Action Plan, a comprehensive portfolio of projects focused on Great Lakes protection.

USDA. FS. Southern Research Station. CompassLive.

Native freshwater mussels grew more slowly when invasive Asian clams (Corbicula fluminea) were abundant. The study was led by Wendell Haag, a USDA Forest Service research fisheries biologist. It was published in the journal Freshwater Biology. Mussels live out of sight – buried in the river bottom, eating algae and other small particles of organic material. Mussels are filter feeders and key members of aquatic ecosystems. Unfortunately, mussels are disappearing worldwide, and about 70 percent of the 300 mussel species native to the U.S. are in danger of extinction. Addressing mussel declines is difficult because their causes are mostly unknown.