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Invasive Species Resources

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New York Department of Agriculture and Markets.
Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture. Plant Industry.
Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources.
Do you hike? Boat? Or camp? Check out these fact sheets for tips to reduce the chance of spreading invasives when you recreate on DCNR lands and in your own backyard.
Arizona Department of Agriculture.
New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets. Cooperative Agricultural Pest Survey.
See also: Fruit and Vegetable Invaders for more fact sheets
Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture.
Tests by the National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Ames, Iowa have confirmed the presence of Asian, or longhorn tick, Haemaphysalis longicornis, in Pennsylvania. An invasive species that congregates in large numbers and can cause anemia in livestock, the tick was discovered on a wild deer in Centre County. It is known to carry several diseases that infect hogs and cattle in Asia. So far, ticks examined in the U.S. do not carry any infectious pathogens. Native to East and Central Asia, the tick was originally identified in the U.S. in New Jersey, where it was found in large numbers in sheep in Mercer County in 2017. It has also been found in Arkansas, New Jersey, New York, West Virginia and Virginia.
Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture.
On Aug. 9, 2011, the department in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture and Penn State Cooperative Extension confirmed the presence of Thousand Cankers Disease in black walnut trees in Bucks County. Since this pest complex cannot be eradicated in Pennsylvania, and since black walnut is of high value to the forest products industry and to forest and urban ecologies, the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture is joining with state and federal agencies and Penn State Cooperative Extension to slow the spread of TCD in the state through monitoring and quarantine. For more information or to report a possible case of Thousand Cankers Disease on walnut please contact your Pennsylvania local county cooperative extension office or contact the Invasive Species Hotline at 1-866-253-7189 or Badbug@pa.gov.
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.
Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection.

Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources.

Pennsylvania Game Commission.
Provides facts about bird flu and wild birds, answers to common questions and links to more detailed information
Pennsylvania Game Commission.
Pennsylvania Game Commission.
Pennsylvania Game Commission.
Google. YouTube; Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture.
Google. YouTube; New York Department of Environmental Conservation.