An official website of the United States government

The .gov means it’s official.
Federal government websites always use a .gov or .mil domain. Before sharing sensitive information online, make sure you’re on a .gov or .mil site by inspecting your browser’s address (or “location”) bar.

This site is also protected by an SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) certificate that’s been signed by the U.S. government. The https:// means all transmitted data is encrypted  — in other words, any information or browsing history that you provide is transmitted securely.

You are here Back to top

Invasive Species Resources

Displaying 501 to 520 of 572

Search Help
Tahoe Resource Conservation District; Tahoe Regional Planning Agency; DOI. Fish and Wildlife Service.
Watercraft are the largest vectors for spreading aquatic invasive species (AIS), such as quagga and zebra mussels into new waterways, making boat inspections a vital aspect of protecting Lake Tahoe and other nearby water bodies.
University of Idaho. Rangeland Ecology and Management.
Prepared by: American Sheep Industry Association
California Invasive Plant Council.

San Francisco Estuary Institute; Center for Research on Aquatic Bioinvasions.

San Francisco Estuary Institute; Center for Research on Aquatic Bioinvasions.

San Francisco Estuary Institute; Center for Research on Aquatic Bioinvasions.

Arizona State University. Agriculture and Life Sciences.
See also: Citrus Insect Pests for more factsheets
Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture.
On Aug. 9, 2011, the department in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture and Penn State Cooperative Extension confirmed the presence of Thousand Cankers Disease in black walnut trees in Bucks County. Since this pest complex cannot be eradicated in Pennsylvania, and since black walnut is of high value to the forest products industry and to forest and urban ecologies, the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture is joining with state and federal agencies and Penn State Cooperative Extension to slow the spread of TCD in the state through monitoring and quarantine. For more information or to report a possible case of Thousand Cankers Disease on walnut please contact your Pennsylvania local county cooperative extension office or contact the Invasive Species Hotline at 1-866-253-7189 or Badbug@pa.gov.
University of California. Statewide Integrated Pest Management Program.
University of California. Agriculture and Natural Resources.

California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection.

See also: Demonstration State Forests - Publications for more fact sheets
University of California. Statewide Integrated Pest Management Program.
The UC IPM Weed Photo Gallery includes many, but not all, weed species commonly found in California farms and landscapes.
University of California. Statewide Integrated Pest Management Program.
University of California. Statewide Integrated Pest Management Program.
University of California. Statewide Integrated Pest Management Program.

University of California. Statewide Integrated Pest Management Program.

University of California - Los Angeles. UCLA Newsroom.
USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.
USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) confirmed the presence of virulent Newcastle disease in a commercial chicken flock in Riverside County, California. This finding is part of an outbreak in southern California that began in May 2018 in backyard exhibition birds. This is the first case in commercial poultry since 2003.

Virulent Newcastle disease is not a food safety concern.  No human cases of Newcastle disease have ever occurred from eating poultry products.

USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

The United States Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) confirmed the presence of virulent Newcastle disease in a small flock of backyard exhibition chickens in Los Angeles County, California. It is important to note that the presence of the disease is not a food safety concern. This is the first case of virulent Newcastle disease, previously referred to as exotic Newcastle disease, in the U.S. since 2003.