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Invasive Species Resources

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Pennsylvania State University.

University of California - Riverside. Center for Invasive Species Research.
DOI. NPS. Inventory & Monitoring Program.
California Department of Food and Agriculture. Animal Health Branch.
See also: Cattle Health for more resources
University of California - Riverside. Center for Invasive Species Research.
Pennsylvania State University. Cooperative Extension.

Washington Invasive Species Council.

The states of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho are urging people to report any feral pig sighting by calling a toll-free, public hotline, the Swine Line: 1-888-268-9219. The states use hotline information to quickly respond to a feral swine detection, helping to eradicate and curb the spread of the invasive species. See also: Feral Swine Fact Sheet (PDF | 208 KB) and Squeal on Pigs! Poster (PDF | 20. MB)

Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture.
Tests by the National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Ames, Iowa have confirmed the presence of Asian, or longhorn tick, Haemaphysalis longicornis, in Pennsylvania. An invasive species that congregates in large numbers and can cause anemia in livestock, the tick was discovered on a wild deer in Centre County. It is known to carry several diseases that infect hogs and cattle in Asia. So far, ticks examined in the U.S. do not carry any infectious pathogens. Native to East and Central Asia, the tick was originally identified in the U.S. in New Jersey, where it was found in large numbers in sheep in Mercer County in 2017. It has also been found in Arkansas, New Jersey, New York, West Virginia and Virginia.
California Department of Food and Agriculture. Plant Health Division. Pest Exclusion Branch.

California Foundation for Agriculture in the Classroom.

See also: Stop the Invasion Fact Sheet Set for more resources

California Foundation for Agriculture in the Classroom.
See also: Stop the Invasion Fact Sheet Set for more resources
California Foundation for Agriculture in the Classroom.
See also: Stop the Invasion Fact Sheet Set for more resources
California Foundation for Agriculture in the Classroom.
With the Stop the Invasion Fact Sheet Set, students will read about six different invasive species, the damage they cause and how to stop their spread. The accompanying lessons and activities are aligned to California Common Core and Next Generation Science Standards. This resource was funded through a Specialty Crop Block grant from the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA).
University of California - Riverside. Center for Invasive Species Research.
California Oak Mortality Task Force.
California Oak Mortality Task Force.