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Invasive Species Resources

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North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. North Carolina Forest Service.
The emerald ash borer is a metallic green beetle that bores into ash trees feeding on tissues beneath the bark, ultimately killing the tree. It is not native to the United States and was first found in the U.S. near Detroit, Michigan in 2002. In 2013, the emerald ash borer was found in Granville, Person, Vance, and Warren counties in North Carolina. In 2015 it was found in many additional counties, and a statewide EAB quarantine went into effect in North Carolina.
South Australia Primary Industries and Regions (Australia).
UNFAO. Animal Production and Health Division.
Bay of Plenty Regional Council (New Zealand).
Auckland Council (New Zealand).

Australian Government. Department of Agriculture and Water Resources.

Formerly the Invasive Plants and Animals Committee (IPAC).
Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.
Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.
Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.
Invaders of the Forest is an educators' guide to invasive plants of Wisconsin forests. The guide provides classroom and field activities for formal and non-formal educators working with kindergarten through adult audiences. Lessons are correlated to Wisconsin's academic standards.
UNFAO. International Plant Protection Convention.
You cannot protect the environment without also safeguarding plant health. When plant pests and diseases spread into new areas they seriously damage entire ecosystems, putting at risk biological diversity and the environment itself. Tiny and lethal at the same time, plant pests and invasive alien species have been recently identified as the main driver of biodiversity loss. Pests are also responsible for losses of up to USD 220 billion in agricultural trade each year and the loss of 40 percent of the global food crop production. Climate change is making the situation even worse. It is changing the life cycle of pests – sometimes increasing the number of yearly generations - and creating new niches where they can thrive. For more information see the IPPC factsheet "Plant Health and Environmental Protection (PDF | 1.22 MB)".
European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization.
European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization.
Contains several databases: EPPO Codes, EPPO Global Database, EPPO Database on PP1 Standards – Efficacy evaluation of PPPs, EPPO Database on Diagnostic Expertise, and CAPRA (Computer Assisted Pest Risk Analysis).
European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization.

European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization.

European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization.

European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization.

European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization.

European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization.