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Invasive Species Resources

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New York State Agricultural Experiment Station.
New York Department of Environmental Conservation.
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.
New York Department of Environmental Conservation.
New York Department of Environmental Conservation.
New York Department of Environmental Conservation.
New York Department of Environmental Conservation.
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.
Delaware Department of Agriculture.

New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets.

New York Department of Agriculture and Markets.

Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control. Natural Heritage and Endangered Species Program.
Delaware Department of Agriculture.
Alaska Department of Natural Resources. Division of Agriculture.
New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets. Cooperative Agricultural Pest Survey.
See also: Fruit and Vegetable Invaders for more fact sheets

Delaware Department of Agriculture.

The spotted lanternfly – a destructive, invasive plant hopper – has been confirmed in New Castle County. Delaware is the second state to have found the insect which was first detected in the United States in 2014, in Berks County, PA. The spotted lanternfly has now spread to 13 Pennsylvania counties.This insect is a potential threat to several important agricultural crops including grapes, apples, peaches, and lumber. State plant health and forestry officials are providing information, fact sheets, photographs, and links to other resources at Delaware's Spotted Lanternfly resource page. Early detection is vital for the protection of Delaware businesses and agriculture.

New Hampshire Division of Forests and Lands.

As of Jul 2011, New Hampshire has banned the importation of untreated firewood without a commercial or home heating compliance agreement. Firewood is a major source of damaging insects and diseases. This ban will help protect the health on New Hampshire's forests.

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.