An official website of the United States government

The .gov means it’s official.
Federal government websites always use a .gov or .mil domain. Before sharing sensitive information online, make sure you’re on a .gov or .mil site by inspecting your browser’s address (or “location”) bar.

This site is also protected by an SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) certificate that’s been signed by the U.S. government. The https:// means all transmitted data is encrypted  — in other words, any information or browsing history that you provide is transmitted securely.

You are here Back to top

Invasive Species Resources

Displaying 1 to 20 of 55

Search Help
New York Invasive Species Awareness Week.
The mission of the New York Invasive Species Awareness Week (ISAW) is to promote knowledge and understanding of invasive species and the harm they can cause by engaging citizens in a wide range of activities across the state, and empowering them to take action to help stop the spread. This annual education campaign is comprised of various outreach initiatives and events led by partner organizations statewide. Activities include interpretive hikes, invasive plant removal, and restoration projects, displays, webinars, radio and television programming, and more.
Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program.
Catskills Regional Invasive Species Partnership.
New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services. Coastal Program.
St. Lawrence - Eastern Lake Ontario Partnership For Regional Invasive Species Management (New York).
St. Lawrence - Eastern Lake Ontario Partnership For Regional Invasive Species Management (New York).

University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health.

Finger Lakes Partnership for Regional Invasive Species Management (New York).
USDA. National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
Map tool allows access to specific colleges and universities (includes Extension) that make up the land-grant university system and provides links to the institution's websites.

National Plant Diagnostic Network.

NPDN is a national network of diagnostic laboratories that rapidly and accurately detect and report pathogens that cause plant diseases of national interest, particularly those that could be deemed to be a biosecurity risk. The specific purpose of the NPDN is to provide a cohesive, distributed system to quickly detect and identify pests and pathogens of concern.

Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program.

The Nature Conservancy's Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program (APIPP) is celebrating its 20th anniversary by launching a new public awareness campaign focused on the simple steps Adirondack residents and visitors can take to prevent invasive species from spreading into the places they love. The "Keep Invasive Species Out" campaign is centered around a new website, KeepInvasiveSpeciesOut.com, that provides an overview of the problem and offers simple, preventive solutions for limiting the likelihood of unintentionally spreading an invasive. Tips are given for specific outdoor activities, including hiking, camping, boating, fishing, hunting, mountain biking, horseback riding, gardening/landscaping, and farming.

New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse.

New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse.

New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse.

New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse.

New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse.

New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse.

New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse.

New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse.

Emerald ash borer was first confirmed in New York in June 2009 near Randolph, in western Cattaraugus County. The rapid spread of the beetle through North America is most likely due to the transport of infested firewood, ash nursery stock, unprocessed ash logs, and other ash products. In an effort to slow the continued spread of EAB, both Federal and New York State agencies have instituted quarantines of infested areas to regulate the transport of ash products.

New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse.