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Invasive Species Resources

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Delaware Invasive Species Council.
Be on the lookout for these up-and-coming invaders! They might not be in Delaware yet, but our best defense is early detection and rapid response!
New Hampshire Department of Agriculture, Markets, and Food.
Boxwood blight is a disease affecting plants in the family Buxaceae including boxwoods (Buxus), Pachysandra, and Sarcococca plants. First detected in the U.S. in 2011, it has since been found in multiple states and provinces from the East Coast to the West Coast. Boxwood blight has now been confirmed on boxwood nursery stock in New Hampshire. New Hampshire nurseries, landscapers, town officials and residents responsible for boxwood plantings should learn the symptoms associated with boxwood blight. Watch for black lesions on stems, "zonate" brown spots on leaves leading to chlorosis, and leaf drop. If boxwood blight is suspected on recently purchased boxwoods, or plants in proximity to recently purchased boxwoods, please contact the Division and collect a sample for analysis by the UNH Plant Diagnostic Lab.

New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. Division of Fish and Wildlife.

See also: Aquatic Invasive Species for related information
University of New Hampshire. Cooperative Extension; New Hampshire Department of Agriculture, Markets & Food.
The Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) was found in Worcester, MA in August 2008 and in Boston in July 2010. This insect pest poses a serious risk to trees and forests. ALB has not yet been found in New Hampshire. Help us by looking at the debris from your swimming pools. Whenever you clean your pool, look at the debris you collect in your filter and skimmers. Use this fact sheet (PDF | 1.22 MB) to compare collected insects to common insects. Upload pictures of any insect you think is a longhorned beetle.
University of New Hampshire. Cooperative Extension.
As of February 2015, brown marmorated stinkbug (BMSB) has been confirmed in 20 New Hampshire towns/cities. With the exception of a confirmation on nursery stock (shipped several months earlier from Long Island, NY), no specimens have yet been found on any crop. The vast majority of specimens have been found on or in buildings. We need your help. We want to find out where BMSB occurs in New Hampshire. Let us know if you see this species in or on your New Hampshire home. Verbal descriptions are not much use, but clear, close-up photos or specimens are helpful. We want to track this insect in NH and how it builds in numbers.
Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control. Division of Fish and Wildlife.
Northern snakeheads (Channa argus), an invasive fish, have recently been confirmed in Delaware waters. Three adult snakeheads were collected from the Delaware portion of the Nanticoke watershed: Broad Creek in Laurel, Nanticoke Branch upstream of Seaford, and the Marshyhope at Woodenhawk. The Fisheries Section asks that any possible snakehead catches in any Delaware waters be reported by emailing a photograph and details to edna.stetzar@state.de.us