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Invasive Species Resources

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Iowa Department of Natural Resources.
Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship. Entomology and Plant Science Bureau.
The Iowa Tree Pests website was designed to be an up-to-date source of information for Iowa, and for any person who wants to learn more about invasive tree pests. There currently are several invasive insect and disease pests on the horizon, not only of great concern for Iowa and the Midwest, but also the entire United States.
Lake George Park Commission.
From May 1st - Oct. 31st, all trailered boats being launched must be inspected at one of the 7 regional inspection stations.
New Hampshire Lakes Association.
Utah Department of Natural Resources. Division of Wildlife Resources.
Aquatic invasive species (AIS) personnel from the Utah Department of Natural Resources (DNR) have stopped more than 120 mussel-infested boats this year, most of which had visited Lake Powell, from launching at other Utah waterbodies. So far in 2018, more than 100 mussel-infested boats have been quarantined, a significant increase compared to recent years. "The quagga situation at Lake Powell has worsened. If you boat at Lake Powell it's very likely your boat has quagga mussels on it," said AIS Program Coordinator Nathan Owens. "With more mussels in the lake and lower water levels more boaters have mussels attached to their vessels than in past years. Our techs are regularly finding them on and in boats that have only been in Lake Powell for a day or two — something we haven't experienced in the past." Boaters that visit another lake or reservoir after visiting Lake Powell will have their boat inspected again. If mussels are found the boat will be decontaminated and quarantined, if necessary.
New York State Department of Health.
Iowa State University. Extension and Outreach.
DOI. NPS. Glen Canyon National Recreation Area.
It is crucial to keep the mussels from moving from Lake Powell to other lakes and rivers. Utah and Arizona state laws require you to clean, drain, and dry your boat when leaving Lake Powell using self-decontamination procedures. Additional steps are required if you launch on other waters without a significant drying period or if you are on Lake Powell for more than 5 days.

Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program.

The Nature Conservancy's Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program (APIPP) is celebrating its 20th anniversary by launching a new public awareness campaign focused on the simple steps Adirondack residents and visitors can take to prevent invasive species from spreading into the places they love. The "Keep Invasive Species Out" campaign is centered around a new website, KeepInvasiveSpeciesOut.com, that provides an overview of the problem and offers simple, preventive solutions for limiting the likelihood of unintentionally spreading an invasive. Tips are given for specific outdoor activities, including hiking, camping, boating, fishing, hunting, mountain biking, horseback riding, gardening/landscaping, and farming.
New Hampshire Department of Agriculture, Markets & Food.
See also: Invasive Plants for more resources
New Hampshire Department of Agriculture, Markets & Food.
See also: Invasive Plants for more resources

New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse.

New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse.

New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse.

New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse.

New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse.

New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse.

New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse.

New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse.

Emerald ash borer was first confirmed in New York in June 2009 near Randolph, in western Cattaraugus County. The rapid spread of the beetle through North America is most likely due to the transport of infested firewood, ash nursery stock, unprocessed ash logs, and other ash products. In an effort to slow the continued spread of EAB, both Federal and New York State agencies have instituted quarantines of infested areas to regulate the transport of ash products.