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Invasive Species Resources

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DOI. NPS. Biscayne National Park.
Oklahoma State University. Entomology & Plant Pathology.
University of Florida. Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.
See also: IPM Florida - Invasive Plants for more publications
Alabama Cooperative Extension System.
Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology.
Note: Nesting Behavior
University of Florida. Emerging Pathogens Institute.
Cornell University. Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County. Horticulture Diagnostic Laboratory.
See also: Tree and Shrub Disease for more fact sheets.

Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources.

University of Florida. IFAS Extension. Integrated Pest Management.
Oklahoma State University. Entomology and Plant Pathology.
Tennessee Valley Authority.
Last year, the TVA found water hyacinth in a slough near Scottsboro. TVA quickly partnered with the State of Alabama, bringing experts from both sides to start addressing the invasive water weed. Water hyacinth is bad news for Guntersville and other great fisheries in the Tennessee Valley. The plant can quickly outcompete other beneficial plants, often creating biological wastelands. Hartis and his team are asking the public to be on the lookout for hyacinth this summer. “If you see a [hyacinth] plant, pull it out of the water immediately and put it in the trash. We don’t want plants to float to a new area and establish a new colony.” If you find a large area of hyacinth, please report it to TVA's Public Land Information Center at (800) 882-5263 (between 8 a.m. and 6 p.m. Eastern).
Cornell University. Agriculture and Life Sciences.
This guide provides photographs and descriptions of biological control (or biocontrol) agents of insect, disease, and weed pests in North America. It is also a tutorial on the concept and practice of biological control and integrated pest management (IPM). Whether you are an educator, a commercial grower, a student, a researcher, a land manager, or an extension or regulatory agent, we hope you will find this information useful.
Cornell University Cooperative Extension. Department of Natural Resources.
See also: ForestConnect Fact Sheet Series for more factsheets.
New York Department of Environmental Conservation.
New Hampshire Department of Agriculture, Markets, and Food.
Boxwood blight is a disease affecting plants in the family Buxaceae including boxwoods (Buxus), Pachysandra, and Sarcococca plants. First detected in the U.S. in 2011, it has since been found in multiple states and provinces from the East Coast to the West Coast. Boxwood blight has now been confirmed on boxwood nursery stock in New Hampshire. New Hampshire nurseries, landscapers, town officials and residents responsible for boxwood plantings should learn the symptoms associated with boxwood blight. Watch for black lesions on stems, "zonate" brown spots on leaves leading to chlorosis, and leaf drop. If boxwood blight is suspected on recently purchased boxwoods, or plants in proximity to recently purchased boxwoods, please contact the Division and collect a sample for analysis by the UNH Plant Diagnostic Lab.
Commonwealth of Northern Mariana Islands. Division of Fish and Wildlife.
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

DHS. Customs and Border Protection.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) agriculture specialists have already intercepted a dozen significant and potentially destructive pests this year at various ports of entry in Florida as part of the agency's all-encompassing efforts to safeguard American agriculture.

Unknown pests pose a significant risk in agriculture due to a lack of knowledge in controlling the pests and the extent of damage they can cause to crops. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) entomologists recently classified eight pests discovered by CBP agriculture specialists in Florida as first-in-the-nation interceptions and another pest as a new species.

New York Department of Environmental Conservation.