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Invasive Species Resources

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Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program.
South Carolina Native Plant Society.
Fig Buttercup (Ficaria verna, formerly Ranunculus ficaria) is an early-blooming perennial with origins in Europe and northern Africa. It is also called Lesser Celandine, and it is sometimes confused with Marsh Marigold (Caltha palustris). More recently, its behavior has transitioned or is in the process of transitioning to that of an aggressive invasive species that threatens bottomlands throughout its adopted range. Even after its invasiveness was recognized, many people did not anticipate that it would behave invasively in the South, as it has begun to do. Be a Citizen Scientist— We are asking you to help us scout areas near you where it is likely to be found, so that emerging infestations can be documented, treated and monitored.
TexasInvasives.org.
The Invaders of Texas Program is an innovative campaign whereby volunteer "citizen scientists" are trained to detect the arrival and dispersal of invasive species in their own local areas. That information is delivered into a statewide mapping database and to those who can do something about it. The premise is simple. The more trained eyes watching for invasive species, the better our chances of lessening or avoiding damage to our native landscape.
DOI. NPS. Saguaro National Park.
Help preserve the Sonoran Desert by removing buffelgrass, a highly invasive grass that threatens native plants and wildlife populations. Volunteers are needed to assist with buffelgrass pulls, held the second Saturday of each month, from Sept-May.
Cornell University. Forest Health and Invasive Non-native Forest Pests.

Portland State University (Oregon).

University of New Hampshire. Cooperative Extension.

Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum.

The rapid spread of buffelgrass through the Sonoran Desert rivals climate change and water scarcity as our region's most pressing environmental issue. Buffelgrass is one of many plants that were brought here from other parts of the world. Lacking the insects, diseases, and other organisms that helped keep them in check back home, some have spread like wildfire, much to the detriment of our native plants and animals. Buffelgrass is the worst of these invasive plants because it is not only invading our desert, but transforming our formerly fire-proof desert into a fire-prone grassland. The fight to control buffelgrass is the fight to save an ecosystem and some of the most magnificent stands of saguaros in the world. Volunteer for a buffelgrass pull, register your own buffelgrass pull, or request a presentation or ID guide.

Oregon Public Broadcasting.

Benton Soil and Water Conservation District (Oregon).

Utah Department of Natural Resources. Division of Wildlife Resources.