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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Oregon Invasive Species Council.

In 2010, Oregon, Washington, and Idaho launched a tri-state outreach campaign to inform the public about the dangers of moving firewood to Pacific Northwest forests. The campaign, funded by the United States Department of Agriculture, closely followed the messaging of the national Don't Move Firewood campaign, which recommends buy firewood that was cut locally, preferably within the county or region of where it will be burned. The tri-state outreach campaign, Buy It Where You Burn It, encouraged good campfire practices with branded posters, billboards, and playing cards located at rest stops and state parks.

North Carolina Forest Service.

Fact Sheet 5.4 in Changing Roles: Wildland-Urban Interface Professional Development Program. See also: Forest Health - Use Local Firewood for more resources.

New Hampshire Division of Forests and Lands.

As of Jul 2011, New Hampshire has banned the importation of untreated firewood without a commercial or home heating compliance agreement. Firewood is a major source of damaging insects and diseases. This ban will help protect the health on New Hampshire's forests.

Oregon State University. Extension Service.

The purpose of this publication is to alert Oregonians to the risk of introducing or dispersing invasive forest pests through firewood. Although Oregon law restricts the import of untreated commercial firewood, there still is a risk that people moving firewood will introduce or spread pests. Interstate transport of firewood by people is one of the most important avenues for dispersal of many invasive forest pests. See also: Forest Health, Insects and Disease for more publications.

Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation, and Forestry. Maine Forest Service.

Moving firewood can transport exotic insects & diseases that pose a serious threat to our forests. Don't transport firewood -- BURN IT WHERE YOU BUY IT!

North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. North Carolina Forest Service.
Emerald ash borer, laurel wilt disease, thousand cankers disease, and the European gypsy moth are likely to be brought into North Carolina in or on firewood. The use of local firewood is an important factor in preventing the spread of potentially devastating invasive species to our state's forests. Please keep this in mind as you prepare for your outdoor recreation activities. See Forest Health Invasive Pest Maps for more information about pest monitoring.