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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Idaho Department of Agriculture.

Idaho State Department of Agriculture.

It is important to stop new outbreaks before they start. You can protect Idaho from invasive species by taking action. By the time an invader is readily noticeable and begins to cause damage, it is often too late, resulting in an expensive removal of the established invader. If we detect new outbreaks early and act quickly to control them, we can avoid many of the environmental and economic losses caused by invasive species.

King County Department of Natural Resources (Washington). Water and Land Resources Division.
Vermont Agency of Natural Resources. Fish & Wildlife Department.
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.
The Washington State Watercraft Passport is free and available for use by the public. The passport is primarily designed for Washington residents who regularly transport recreational watercraft in and out of the state, but is available to any boater. The passport can help boaters to keep track of the waters they've visited and aquatic invasive species (AIS) inspection stations they've stopped at.

California Department of Food and Agriculture. Citrus Pest and Disease Prevention Program.

The Asian citrus psyllid and citrus greening (Huanglongbing) could be a death sentence for California citrus trees - but with support from California residents, we can save the citrus trees that we all know and love.

Utah Department of Natural Resources. Division of Wildlife Resources.