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Invasive Species Resources

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Cornell University (New York).
See also: Clinic Factsheets for more diseases
University of Nebraska. Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources.
Purdue University.
A major tool in the fight against invasive species is the Report INvasive website, hosted by Purdue College of Agriculture and the Indiana Invasive Species Council. The website includes several ways that people can report invasive species, including a smartphone app from the Great Lakes Early Detection Network. “There are not that many specialists and experts covering the state,” Sadof said. “When there are concerned citizens reporting, however, we have many more eyes and a better chance of detecting and eradicating a harmful species early.”
Purdue University. Botany and Plant Pathology.
Utah State University. Extension.
Utah State University. Extension.

University of Nebraska - Lincoln. Nebraska Invasive Species Program.

Please complete this form to report a sighting of an invasive species. If you're not sure how to answer a question, do your best and we will contact you with any questions. If you have any questions for us, please feel free to contact us.

University of New Hampshire. Cooperative Extension.
Iowa State University.
University of Nebraska - Lincoln. Nebraska Invasive Species Program.
University of Nebraska - Lincoln. Cooperative Extension.
University of Nebraska - Lincoln. Cooperative Extension.
Note: Economics of Damage and Control
University of New Hampshire. Cooperative Extension.
As of February 2015, brown marmorated stinkbug (BMSB) has been confirmed in 20 New Hampshire towns/cities. With the exception of a confirmation on nursery stock (shipped several months earlier from Long Island, NY), no specimens have yet been found on any crop. The vast majority of specimens have been found on or in buildings. We need your help. We want to find out where BMSB occurs in New Hampshire. Let us know if you see this species in or on your New Hampshire home. Verbal descriptions are not much use, but clear, close-up photos or specimens are helpful. We want to track this insect in NH and how it builds in numbers.
Purdue University Extension. Weed Science.
Utah State University Extension.
Utah State University Extension; Utah Plant Pest Diagnostic Laboratory.
See also: Tree Fruit Insects Fact Sheets for more species