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Invasive Species Resources

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University of Georgia. Bugwood Network.
Georgia Forestry Commission.
University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health.
Provides comprehensive information on cogongrass in Georgia along with links to other southeastern state efforts on cogongrass. To date, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina and Texas have on-going research, education and/or control programs that are supported by university, state and federal agency cooperators.
Virginia Department of Forestry.
Georgia Invasive Species Task Force.
New York City Department of Health.
University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health; Megacopta Working Group.

New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse.

Cornell University. Forest Health and Invasive Non-native Forest Pests.
University of New Hampshire. Cooperative Extension; New Hampshire Department of Agriculture, Markets & Food.
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.
New York Department of Environmental Conservation.

Cornell University. New York State Integrated Pest Management Program.

Utah Department of Agriculture and Food.

New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets.

University of New Hampshire. Cooperative Extension.
Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation.
South Dakota Department of Health.