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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade, and Consumer Protection.

New York Department of Environmental Conservation.

New York Department of Environmental Conservation.

New York Department of Environmental Conservation.

New York Department of Environmental Conservation.

New York Department of Environmental Conservation.

New York Department of Environmental Conservation.

New York Department of Environmental Conservation.

Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.

Maryland Department of Natural Resources.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. Exotic Species Program.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

Alabama Forestry Commission.

Illinois Department of Agriculture. Bureau of Environmental Programs. Division of Natural Resources.
Native to Asia, the Emerald Ash Borer is an exotic beetle that was unknown in North America until June 2002 when it was discovered as the cause for the decline of many ash trees in southeast Michigan and neighboring Windsor, Ontario, Canada. It has since been found in several states from the east coast spanning across the midwest and in June 2006, we discovered that it had taken up residence in Illinois.