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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources (alphabetically), with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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New Hampshire Department of Agriculture, Markets, and Food.

Boxwood blight is a disease affecting plants in the family Buxaceae including boxwoods (Buxus), Pachysandra, and Sarcococca plants. First detected in the U.S. in 2011, it has since been found in multiple states and provinces from the East Coast to the West Coast. Boxwood blight has now been confirmed on boxwood nursery stock in New Hampshire. New Hampshire nurseries, landscapers, town officials and residents responsible for boxwood plantings should learn the symptoms associated with boxwood blight. Watch for black lesions on stems, "zonate" brown spots on leaves leading to chlorosis, and leaf drop. If boxwood blight is suspected on recently purchased boxwoods, or plants in proximity to recently purchased boxwoods, please contact the Division and collect a sample for analysis by the UNH Plant Diagnostic Lab.

Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Plant Industry.

Georgia Forestry Commission.

Cogongrass, Imperata cylindrica (L.), is considered the seventh worst weed in the world and listed as a federal noxious weed by USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service - Plant Protection and Quarantine. Cogongrass infestations are being found primarily in south Georgia but is capable of growing throughout the state. Join the cogongrass eradication team in Georgia and be a part of protecting our state's forest and wildlife habitat. Report a potential cogongrass sighting online or call your local GFC Forester.

Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Division of Plant Industry.

Contains fact sheets and other resources for Mediterranean fruit fly, Mexican fruit fly, and Oriental fruit fly

Collier Soil and Water Conservation District (Florida).

New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. Division of Fish and Wildlife.

See also: Aquatic Invasive Species for related information

Georgia Department of Natural Resources. Wildlife Resources Division.

DNR and partners are working to eradicate a wild population of Argentine black and white tegus in Toombs and Tattnall counties in southeast Georgia. Growing up to 4 feet long and weighing 10 pounds or more, this lizard native to South America is an invasive species that threatens Georgia wildlife. Early detection, rapid response and public involvement are key to stopping tegus in this area. In Toombs and Tattnall, DNR's Wildlife Resources Division, the U.S. Geological Survey and Georgia Southern University are trapping tegus, tracking sightings and assessing the population. Tell DNR when you see a tegu in the wild, alive or dead. These reports help biologists document occurrences and respond effectively. Note the location, take a photo if possible and report the sighting:

North Central Integrated Pest Management Center.

See also: Pest Alerts for more resources

North Central Integrated Pest Management Center.

See also: Pest Alerts for more resources

North Central Integrated Pest Management Center.

See also: Pest Alerts for more resources

North Central Integrated Pest Management Center.

See also: Pest Alerts for more resources

North Central Integrated Pest Management Center.

See also: Pest Alerts for more resources

North Central Integrated Pest Management Center.

See also: Pest Alerts for more resources

North Central Integrated Pest Management Center.

See also: Pest Alerts for more resources

North Central Region Pest Management Center.

See also: Pest Alerts for more resources

North Central Integrated Pest Management Center.

See also: Pest Alerts for more resources

University of New Hampshire. Cooperative Extension; New Hampshire Department of Agriculture, Markets & Food.

The Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) was found in Worcester, MA in August 2008 and in Boston in July 2010. This insect pest poses a serious risk to trees and forests. ALB has not yet been found in New Hampshire. Help us by looking at the debris from your swimming pools. Whenever you clean your pool, look at the debris you collect in your filter and skimmers. Use this fact sheet (PDF | 1.22 MB) to compare collected insects to common insects. Upload pictures of any insect you think is a longhorned beetle.

Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture. Plant Industry.
See also: Noxious, Invasive and Poisonous Plant Program Publications for more hogweed resources

Minnesota Department of Agriculture.

In September 2016, Palmer amaranth, Amaranthus palmeri, was found in Minnesota. To date, it has been documented in Douglas, Jackson, Lyon, Redwood, Todd, and Yellow Medicine counties. The Minnesota Department of Agriculture (MDA), University of Minnesota Extension, USDA, landowners and other partners are working to eradicate these infestations before they can spread to new areas. Be proactive and prevent Palmer amaranth establishment. Familiarize yourself with Palmer amaranth identification and actively look for it in crop fields, borders, ditches, conservation lands and around dairies. If you suspect Palmer amaranth on your property, immediately call your local U of M Extension Educator or IPM Specialist, crop consultant and/or the MDA’s Arrest the Pest (888-545-6684) to report locations.