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Invasive Species Resources

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New York Department of Environmental Conservation.
New York Department of Environmental Conservation.
New York Department of Environmental Conservation.
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.
North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Plant Industry Division. Plant Protection Section.
See also: New Pest Alerts for more resources
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. Virginia Cooperative Extension.
Cornell University (New York).
See also: Clinic Factsheets for more diseases
University of the District of Columbia. College of Agriculture, Urban Sustainability, and Environmental Sciences.
South Dakota Department of Agriculture.

New York Department of Agriculture and Markets.

Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.
The Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (VDACS) established a Spotted Lanternfly Quarantine for Frederick County and the city of Winchester, effective immediately. The purpose of the quarantine is to slow the spread of the spotted lanternfly to uninfested areas of the Commonwealth. Early detection is vital for the management of any newly introduced plant pest. For more information on Spotted Lanternfly in Virginia, see: Plant Industry Services (scroll to SLF section).

The spotted lanternfly was first detected in Winchester in January 2018. Subsequent surveys conducted by VDACS indicate that the pest has become established in the city of Winchester and spread into Frederick County, just north of Winchester. Prior to the January 2018 detection in Virginia, the only Spotted Lanternfly (SLF) found in the U.S. was in Pennsylvania. Populations are now established in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware and northern Virginia.
North Carolina State University. Cooperative Extension.
North Carolina State University. Extension.
North Carolina State University. Extension.

Virginia Tech; Virginia State University. Virginia Cooperative Extension.

Report a suspect Spotted Lanternfly. Enables Extension professional to collect information.

North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Plant Industry Division. Plant Protection Section.
University of New Hampshire. Cooperative Extension.
As of February 2015, brown marmorated stinkbug (BMSB) has been confirmed in 20 New Hampshire towns/cities. With the exception of a confirmation on nursery stock (shipped several months earlier from Long Island, NY), no specimens have yet been found on any crop. The vast majority of specimens have been found on or in buildings. We need your help. We want to find out where BMSB occurs in New Hampshire. Let us know if you see this species in or on your New Hampshire home. Verbal descriptions are not much use, but clear, close-up photos or specimens are helpful. We want to track this insect in NH and how it builds in numbers.